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How to Do a SEO Audit [12-Step Guide]

HostGator Blog -

The post How to Do a SEO Audit [12-Step Guide] appeared first on HostGator Blog. Search engine optimization (SEO) requires ongoing work. It can feel like you’re always scrambling to keep up with the basics. But sometimes, it’s actually valuable to take a step back from the day-to-day execution of your strategy to perform an SEO audit. HostGator recently polled our Facebook followers to learn when they did their last SEO audit.  Turns out, more than 50% of them had never performed one. In a way, it’s not that surprising. Website owners are busy, and an SEO audit is the kind of thing that’s hard to prioritize fitting into your calendar. But taking the time to analyze your website’s current SEO status can help you strengthen your strategy and make the work you’ve already put into SEO go further.  What Is an SEO Audit?  An SEO audit is a review of how your website performs now in all the key areas that influence SEO. It helps you spot easy-to-overlook issues that could be negatively affecting your website authority. And it reveals new opportunities to include in your SEO strategy moving forward.  12 Steps to Complete an SEO Audit An SEO audit will require a considerable time commitment, but the good news is that most of the steps involved are something your average website owner can complete on your own, without having to hire a specialist.  1. Google your brand name. Easy enough, right? This may seem like a strange step to include here, since your brand name probably isn’t on the list of top keywords you focus on in your strategy. But as long as your brand name isn’t comprised of a common term, if your website has the SEO basics covered, claiming the top spot for it should be a given.  With this step you can confirm that you are, in fact, the top spot for your brand name. If not, that alerts you to a problem you need to identify, such as a Google penalty or a serious technical issue with your site.  If the basics are covered and you do show up, this step also shows you how your website looks on the search engine result page (SERP), so you can check: What shows up in the meta descriptionIf there are sitelinks—links to specific pages on your site that show up under the main resultIf there’s a knowledge graph listing on the right side of the page—a box all about your brand that includes relevant information about you Google decides which pages to display as sitelinks automatically, so you can’t choose those yourself. But if you don’t have any showing up at all, there are a few steps you can take to increase the likelihood of Google adding sitelinks moving forward, such as developing a clear site architecture for your website and submitting a sitemap in Google Search Console.  If you don’t have a knowledge graph now on the SERP, you can increase your chances of getting one by setting up a Google My Business listing (if your business is eligible). Having an accurate Wikipedia page and using schema markup also helps.  2. Confirm your website has no Google penalties. If your website has been hit with a Google penalty, it’s crucial that you figure it out sooner rather than later so you can take steps to lift it. To find out if you have a manual Google penalty—one that targets your site specifically—check out Google Search Console.  Once logged in, click on Security and Manual Actions in the left-side menu, then click on Manual Actions. If it says No Issues Detected with a green check, then you don’t have a manual penalty. If you do have a manual penalty, you’ll see details on the problem in this section, along with steps to take to get it lifted. 3. Test out your website on mobile. Having a website that provides a good mobile experience is a requirement in 2020, both for SEO and to keep your visitors happy. If your website doesn’t work well on mobile, it will hurt you in the search engine rankings. So double check and make sure your website is intuitive and easy to navigate on mobile. Test it out on any mobile devices you have access to and take a few actions on the site, like signing up for your email list or making a test purchase to make sure you’re testing to the whole experience. Supplement the testing you do on your own with QA testing tools, which will help you see how your website works on different device sizes and browser types than those you use.  If your testing shows your mobile experience leaves something to be desired, make creating a mobile-friendly website a top priority.  4. Check your website speed. Website speed is a key ranking factor. Google knows that people prefer websites that load fast, so their algorithm does too. Google provides a speed testing tool so you can easily check how fast your website is loading. It will provide you with a score, along with information on what’s slowing your website down and recommendations to fix it.  If the speed test suggests your website needs to be faster, there are a number of steps you can take to speed it up, such as compressing your images and getting rid of unnecessary plugins.  5. Make sure browsers default to one version of your domain. You want all the SEO work you do to bolster one version of your website, not be split between several. That means you want to be careful you don’t end up with different versions of your domain, such as: www.yourdomain.comhttp://yourdomain.comhttps://yourdomain.comhttps://www.yourdomain.com You want all of those URLs to bring up your website if someone types them into a browser, but you also want them all to resolve to one consistent version, so you’re not spreading your domain authority between so many places. Choose one version to stick with—probably one of the https options—and set up 301 redirects for all the others.  6. Identify and fix broken links Broken links create a bad website experience for your visitors, which can end up hurting your SEO in turn. Luckily, you don’t have to go page by page on your website and click on every link to spot ones that are bad. You can use a free tool like Dead Link Checker to automatically find all the broken links on your website. Then make a project out of updating or removing them. 7. Make sure your website is secured with https. With data breaches and website hacking on the rise, taking the simple step of purchasing an SSL certificate (or choosing a web hosting plan that includes one) upgrades your website from an http to an https. That immediately signals to both Google and your website visitors that your site is more secure. Google has been upfront about its algorithm favoring https sites, so check that your website is https, and invest in an SSL certificate if it’s not yet.  8. Perform a review of your analytics. You may be regularly reviewing your website analytics as part of your ongoing SEO strategy—that’s definitely recommended! Add in an extra review as part of your SEO audit. You can find pretty much everything you need in Google Analytics, but may want to supplement that data with the analytics included in an SEO tool that makes tracking your rankings easier.  Some of the top things you want to identify here are: Most popular pages – Which of your pages consistently earns the most traffic? Identify them and analyze what they have in common, and what they can tell you about what works best.  Best converting pages – Which pages are driving your visitors to take the actions you most want them to take, like signing up for your email list or making a purchase? Highest ranking pages – There will probably be a correlation between this list and your most popular. Determine which pages have made it onto page one for target keywords, and which have snagged those top spots on the page.  What keywords you rank for – Determine which keywords you’re ranking for now, and what pages have those rankings.   Sudden changes in traffic or rankings – Look for trends in how your website and individual pages perform over time. Are there any sudden increases or dips in traffic or rankings? That may point to a penalty or algorithm update.  Pages on page two of the SERP – Pages that come close to making page one, but just miss the cutoff are a prime SEO opportunity. Create a list of all your web pages that currently rank on page two for a target keyword, so you know to prioritize strengthening them.  Underperforming pages – Pages that get little to no traffic or that get traffic but don’t convert should either be scrapped or updated to make them stronger. Put together a list of these as well, so you can determine how best to handle them.  9.  Create a content update plan. Your analytics review will give you a heads up on this, but flesh out the information you gained there with a content audit. The longer you’ve been doing content marketing, the more pages devoted to content you’ll have. Some of these will be woefully outdated, or not up to your current quality standards. Create a spreadsheet that lists all your content, and put it into categories: Content doing well nowContent doing okay, but that could use an updatePieces that are underperforming Use this spreadsheet to create a plan for which pieces to update, assigning dates for doing so based on priority level.  Those pieces that are on page two or in spots 5-10 on page one now should be a high priority, since you can potentially drive a lot of new traffic by getting a small rankings boost for them. Your top-performing pieces may not need much work, but slight tweaks to keep them up-to-date, add internal links to other pages, and include new calls to action (CTAs) can help you make their success go further. And the underperforming pieces either need a total rehaul, or to be scrapped altogether, with the old URL redirected to another relevant page.  10.  Identify new internal linking opportunities. Most brands concerned with SEO get into the habit of including relevant internal links in the new pages they publish. Fewer do a good job of going back to old content and adding in internal links for newer pieces. Your SEO audit is a good opportunity to do this.  You know the target keyword for each page on the website, do a search of your site to identify all uses of each target keyword you have. Then go in and turn those keyword uses into anchor text for the appropriate page. Building more internal links is an easy way to give Google more signals to associate each page with its target keyword.   11.  Implement or update schema markup. Does your website have schema markup on the relevant pages yet? If not, make part your SEO audit process implementing it. If you have it already, check that it’s set up correctly. Google offers a free tool for testing out structured data. Just enter your URL, and it recognizes structured data on your website, and alerts you to any errors.  Schema markup gives you an additional way to communicate to Google what your page is about, and the type of content it is. That makes it more likely to show up for relevant searches, and also influences whether or not your web pages are likely to show up for certain types of rich snippets, like recipes or local business results. 12.  Evaluate your backlink profile. This is the main step where investing in a paid SEO tool can really pay off. Use it to gain information on which websites are linking back to yours, what pages on your site are earning the most backlinks, and their anchor text. Backlinks are a really important part of SEO, and one of the hardest parts of building website authority. And making matters even more complicated, links from websites Google sees as low authority can hurt your overall SEO performance. It’s just as important to identify low-quality links so you can disavow them, as it is to understand where your good links are coming from. Analyzing your backlink profile also provides useful fodder in the brainstorming and planning you do for your link-building efforts moving forward. Seeing which websites link to you now and to which pages helps you gain clarity in your link-building strategy, so you know the best types of sites to reach out to when promoting specific pieces of content.  Why an SEO Audit is Important All of this looks like a lot of work because, well, it is. You’re already busy with creating content and building links based on the strategy you already have—can you really fit all this in? An SEO audit is absolutely worth your time because it helps you evaluate all the work you’ve done so far. You don’t want to keep putting work into tactics that aren’t helping you. And by taking a strategic approach to improving and boosting the work you’ve already done, you can make all the effort you’ve put into SEO already go a lot further.  An SEO audit is an important process for making sure you still have all the basics in place and your SEO strategy makes sense. And you’ll learn important insights to apply to your strategy moving forward. Fortunately, you can make the audit process go faster, with a free SEO review from the experts at HostGator. Get yours here. Find the post on the HostGator Blog

How To Transfer iPhone photos To Your Computer

Pickaweb Blog -

With iPhone cameras getting better with every new iteration, you are going to need more free space since their images have high resolution. It is not a secret that iPhone devices have sophisticated cameras that produce quality photos thanks to its support for RAW images and 4k videos that produce larger files. If you are The post How To Transfer iPhone photos To Your Computer appeared first on Pickaweb.

How To Deliver An IT Project Successfully

Pickaweb Blog -

Always start with a business question! Every IT project you undertake should answer a fundamental business question. Does this project generate more revenue? Does this align with our company strategy? Will we increase our profit? But I’d like to introduce an overriding question, maybe even more fundamental than the others: Does this project deliver Customer The post How To Deliver An IT Project Successfully appeared first on Pickaweb.

How to Use Instagram Customer Reviews for Maximum Impact

Social Media Examiner -

Are you taking full advantage of glowing reviews from your best customers? Looking for actionable ways to increase your social proof on Instagram? In this article, you’ll learn how to leverage customer testimonials in your Instagram feed, in Stories, and on IGTV. Why Promote Customer Reviews and Testimonials on Instagram? With more than 1 billion […] The post How to Use Instagram Customer Reviews for Maximum Impact appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

The Month in WordPress: January 2020

WordPress.org News -

Following an action-packed December, 2020 is off to a fine start with some new releases and announcements. Read on to find out what happened in the WordPress project in January. Release of Gutenberg 7.2 & 7.3 Gutenberg 7.2, the first Gutenberg release of 2020, was deployed on January 8th and included over 180 pull requests from more than 56 contributors. This was followed soon after by Gutenberg 7.3. New features include a new Buttons block, support in adding links to Media & Text block images, improvements to the Navigation and Gallery blocks, performance improvements, and accessibility enhancements. These releases also included many additional enhancements, fixes, new APIs, documentation, and more. Want to get involved in building Gutenberg? Follow the Core team blog, contribute to Gutenberg on GitHub, and join the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. Proposal for an XML Sitemaps Feature Plugin In June last year, a team of contributors proposed a feature plugin that would bring standardized XML sitemaps to WordPress Core. Since then, the team has been working to bring this to reality and have now published a working plugin to demonstrate this new capability. The plugin is still in development, but the included features already provide much-needed functionality from which all WordPress sites can benefit. You can install the plugin from your WordPress dashboard or download it here. Want to get involved in bringing this feature to Core? Follow the Core team blog, report any issues you find on GitHub, and join the #core channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. A New Block-Based Themes Meeting The Theme Review Team has announced that they will be holding bi-weekly meetings in the #themereview channel focused on discussing block-based themes. If you are interested in discussing themes within the context of Gutenberg’s full-site editing framework, this will be the place to do so! The first meeting will be held on Wednesday, February 5, at 16:00 UTC. Want to get involved with the Theme Review Team or become a reviewer? Follow their blog, and join the #themereview channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. Further Reading The Core team has started work on WordPress 5.4 and kicked off their planning with a summary post. You can follow all the v5.4 updates by watching the version tag on the Core team blog.The inaugural WordCamp Asia event is taking place in February. This will be the largest WordPress event in the region, bringing together around 1,500 WordPress enthusiasts from around the world.Two WordPress community leaders, @chanthaboune and @andreamiddleton, were nominated for CMX awards due to their work on the WordPress project, with @andreamiddleton winning the award for Executive Leader of a Community Team.A feature plugin has been proposed that introduces lazy-loading images to WordPress Core, which will be a huge step forward in improving performance all across the web.The Core team has put together an extensive and informative FAQ to help new contributors get involved in contributing to the project.One key priority for Gutenberg is the ability to control the block editor. There are already a number of APIs that control the experience, but there is a lack of consistency and missing APIs. A method to address this has been proposed.The Design team published detailed information on the recent design improvements in Gutenberg. Have a story that we should include in the next “Month in WordPress” post? Please submit it here.

Facebook and Google Make Retargeting Harder: How to Prepare

Social Media Examiner -

Welcome to this week’s edition of the Social Media Marketing Talk Show, a news show for marketers who want to stay on the leading edge of social media. On this week’s Social Media Marketing Talk Show, we explore how to prepare for Google’s plans to block third-party cookies and the expansion of Facebook’s Clear History […] The post Facebook and Google Make Retargeting Harder: How to Prepare appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

FindMyHost Releases February 2020 Editors’ Choice Awards

My Host News -

OKLAHOMA CITY, OK – Web Hosting Directory and Review site www.FindMyHost.com released the February Editor’s Choice Awards for 2020 today. Web Hosting companies strive to provide their customers with the very best service and support. We want to take the opportunity to acknowledge the hosts per category who have excelled in their field. The FindMyHost Editors’ Choice Awards are chosen based on Editor and Consumer Reviews. Customers who wish to submit positive reviews for the current or past Web Host are free to do so by visiting the customer review section of FindMyHost.com.  By doing so, you nominate your web host for next months Editor’s Choice awards. We would like to congratulate all the web hosts who participated and in particular the following who received top honors in their field: Dedicated Servers GlowHost.com   Visit GlowHost.com  View Report Card Business Hosting BudgetVM.com   Visit BudgetVM.com  View Report Card SSD Hosting MightWeb.net   Visit MightWeb.net  View Report Card VPS VPSFX.com   Visit VPSFX.com  View Report Card Secure Hosting KVCHosting.net   Visit KVCHosting.net  View Report Card Shared Hosting KnownSRV.com   Visit KnownSRV.com  View Report Card Enterprise Hosting Tier.Net   Visit Tier.Net  View Report Card Website Monitoring UptimeSpy.com   Visit UptimeSpy.com  View Report Card About FindMyHost FindMyHost, Inc. is an online magazine that provides editor reviews, consumer hosting news, interviews discussion forums and more. FindMyHost.com was established in January 2001 to protect web host consumers and web developers from making the wrong choice when choosing a web host. FindMyHost.com showcases a selection of web hosting companies who have undergone their approved host program testing and provides reviews from customers. FindMyHost’s extensive website can be found at www.FindMyHost.com.

Magento Vs Shopify! Let’s Find Out Which of Them is Better

Reseller Club Blog -

With every passing day, the e-commerce industry is gaining more and more attention from traditional retailers and brands. The increasing participation has developed an enhanced competition and eventually the chaos linked with choosing the right digital platform.  While Magento has been named a leader in the 2019 Gartner Magic Quadrant Report for Digital Commerce Platforms, there’s still a question amidst enterprises whether to choose Magento or other platforms like Shopify. The reason includes a mixture of the price involved or lack of complete understanding of the features and benefits of Magento.  Busting the myth! The most common reason of all is ‘Magento is Complex’. Well, the truth is, it isn’t!! In fact, Magento has its chain of certified solution partners across the globe. The experienced and qualified team can help you with Magento Migration Services and Magento development services effortlessly. You just have to choose the partner from the official Magento website. However, the question arises, is it all worth the effort?  Magento comes with a host of features in comparison to its close competitors. One such name is Shopify. The e-commerce platform comes with different subscription plans to match your needs. It also has an enterprise solution, wherein, the amount differs based on your requirement.  While most of the audience goes with the subscription plans to avoid the one-time cost incurred on having an enterprise solution. However, with the growing commerce, the needs change and time comes to either upgrade or migrate. Shopify to Magento 2 migration In case your e-commerce is expanding, or you are planning to expand, Magento 2 migration service can be the right choice for you. Besides the above-mentioned differences, here’s a detailed sneak into major reasons to migrate from Shopify to Magento 2. Let’s have a look:   Established Suitable for Customization Visual Potential 3rd Party Integration Business Model and Cost Structure Shopify 2004 Small business Limited Functionality & Customization 100+ Ready Themes 200+ Free & Paid Extensions Particularly subscription Magento 2008 Medium & Large business Deep Customization & Personalization Unlimited Flexibility in theme design 5000+ Free & Paid Extensions Open source and commerce editions More than the basics While both the stores come by default with basic functionalities required for an online store, Magento 2 migration can serve you with many extras. Unlimited inventory size, coupons and discount codes, and multi-language support are what you can have additionally without paying an extra amount. While both the stores support additional third-party extensions, this is again where Magento 2 leads by offering more than 5000 free and paid extensions, whereas Shopify has few hundred in its basket. Potential Both the platforms come with a range of customization possibilities in terms of appearance and functionalities. However, Shopify being a SaaS-based platform, it has a limited scope of modification in comparison to Magento 2. That’s because Magento is an open-source platform written in PHP/JS/HTML. This makes Magento lead here as well with a clear margin.  Ease With Shopify, you can disregard server organization and spotlight on what’s generally significant for your business: developing your stock and concocting better marketing strategies. While Magento, being an open-source platform, expects you to keep your finger on the beat of your server framework consistently to guarantee the perfect degree of execution, information security and strength. It might be considered a tedious task, but it also offers an opportunity to solve execution issues without the help of a support team. Furthermore, you can also actualize complex database models with information replication, load adjusting, and different strategies planned for verifying your store’s information and guaranteeing smooth substance conveyance to your clients.  Before signing off Both Shopify and Magento share an inevitable space in the industry. However, what differentiates them is the size of business and its technological needs. While Shopify has everything to match the expectations of start-ups and small brands, Magento flawlessly serves enterprises and helps them grow in the ultra-competitive market. These were some of the reasons that make Magento a preferred e-commerce solution for enterprises.  In case you are still using Shopify and are seeking Magento 2 migration services, it is recommended to hire a certified Magento solutions partner for the same. You can have the details and other answers on the official Magento website. .fb_iframe_widget_fluid_desktop iframe { width: 100% !important; } The post Magento Vs Shopify! Let’s Find Out Which of Them is Better appeared first on ResellerClub Blog.

The February 2020 promo code is served with a side of scandal

Name.com Blog -

Welcome to another leap year February! As exciting as this once-every-four-years business is, we know the real reason you’re here—to get discounts on your upcoming .com and .net domain renewals. Just ask and you shall receive. Use the promo code TEA February 1 through 29 to renew your .com domains for $10.99 and .net domains […] The post The February 2020 promo code is served with a side of scandal appeared first on Name.com Blog.

Google Search News for January 2020

Google Webmaster Central Blog -

We hope the year 2020 has started off well for you, and wanted to bring a brief update of some of the changes around Google Search since our last episode. We aim to do this in our YouTube Series called Google Search News. In the January 2020 episode, we cover: Updates in Search Console, a free tool from Google to help you succeed with your website in Google Search. Since the last episode, we celebrated the two-year anniversary of the new Search Console, updated the Discover report, and made the Index Coverage report more comprehensive. Another big change was the new messaging system, which integrates directly with various reports. Updated Mobile-First Indexing documentation and some tips, such as making sure your mobile site reflects your full content (we won't use the desktop version at all, once we switch your site over). Also, if you use separate mobile URLs (commonly called m-dot URLs), make sure to use them consistently within your structured data too. The deprecation of support for data-vocabulary.org structured data was recently announced. This markup was mostly used for breadcrumb markup, so if you added that early on, you should double-check the breadcrumb report in Search Console. We make regular updates in Google Search -- our website on How Search Works has more on the backgrounds, if you're curious. In this episode we covered BERT - a modern way for computers to understand natural language - as well as various updates mentioned on our Search Liaison & Webmaster Central Twitter profiles. Chrome has posted on its handling of mixed-content, and we started sending notices to sites using old HTTPS / TLS protocols. Googlebot's rendering has continued to move forward with the new user-agent, which is being used more and more for crawling. and, last but not least, if you'd like to find out more about Search Console, check out our new Search Console training video series! We hope you find these updates useful! Let us know in the video comments, or on Twitter, if there's something we can improve on. Posted by John Mueller, Google Search-Relations team, Zurich

Google Search News for January 2020

Google Webmaster Central Blog -

We hope the year 2020 has started off well for you, and wanted to bring a brief update of some of the changes around Google Search since our last episode. We aim to do this in our YouTube Series called Google Search News. In the January 2020 episode, we cover: Updates in Search Console, a free tool from Google to help you succeed with your website in Google Search. Since the last episode, we celebrated the two-year anniversary of the new Search Console, updated the Discover report, and made the Index Coverage report more comprehensive. Another big change was the new messaging system, which integrates directly with various reports. Updated Mobile-First Indexing documentation and some tips, such as making sure your mobile site reflects your full content (we won't use the desktop version at all, once we switch your site over). Also, if you use separate mobile URLs (commonly called m-dot URLs), make sure to use them consistently within your structured data too. The deprecation of support for data-vocabulary.org structured data was recently announced. This markup was mostly used for breadcrumb markup, so if you added that early on, you should double-check the breadcrumb report in Search Console. We make regular updates in Google Search -- our website on How Search Works has more on the backgrounds, if you're curious. In this episode we covered BERT - a modern way for computers to understand natural language - as well as various updates mentioned on our Search Liaison & Webmaster Central Twitter profiles. Chrome has posted on its handling of mixed-content, and we started sending notices to sites using old HTTPS / TLS protocols. Googlebot's rendering has continued to move forward with the new user-agent, which is being used more and more for crawling. and, last but not least, if you'd like to find out more about Search Console, check out our new Search Console training video series! We hope you find these updates useful! Let us know in the video comments, or on Twitter, if there's something we can improve on. Posted by John Mueller, Google Search-Relations team, Zurich

Web Hosting Hot Topics: Caching, Themes & Customer Service

HostGator Blog -

The post Web Hosting Hot Topics: Caching, Themes & Customer Service appeared first on HostGator Blog. This article is part of HostGator’s Web Pros Series. In this series, we feature articles from our team of experts here at HostGator. Our Product Managers, Linux Administrators, Marketers, and Tech Support engineers share their best tips for getting the most out of your website. One of the best things about working at HostGator is helping customers set up and run great websites. That means we do a lot of listening and answering customer questions. In December, HostGator held a customer gathering in Austin so we could meet some of you and answer your pressing website questions in person.  Of course, not everyone could drop by Austin—although if you get a chance, you should. So here I’ll go over three of the big things our meetup attendees wanted to know more about. Hot Topic #1: Why Does Your Website Need Caching? One of the biggest topics at our event was caching, and why customers need it for their sites. The short answer is that your site needs caching because it’s best practice for making websites load as quickly as possible, even those on superfast servers. Pretty much every fast website that you’ve ever been to is using caching at multiple layers.  If your site doesn’t use caching, you’re not meeting the standard for site performance. It’s probably going to load more slowly than visitors expect.  Make visitors wait and they’re likely to bounce. Caching can help you avoid that. Why does caching make a site load faster? A super-simple answer You’ve probably heard of read-only files. They’re files that don’t get changed, only displayed. Well, in simple terms, most websites are what we could call “read mostly.” They do get read, and site owners do make changes to them.  But for the most part, websites are read way more frequently than they’re changed. Because all the content doesn’t change often, it can be stored in a cache for fast access instead of retrieved from the server every time.  Why does caching make a site load faster? A less-simple answer Without caching, every time you load a webpage, the browser has to go to the site server’s hard disk, pull out the PHP files, and then run those files, which go to the site’s database. So the browser also has to read the database.  Then, between the PHP and the database, you have to generate HTML along with some JavaScript and some other things that finally get sent back to the browser to display the site content. Running the PHP files and reading the database takes a lot of time compared to just sending the data. In terms of actual time elapsed, this process doesn’t take too long. But in internet-user time, it feels like forever. By the five-second mark, most visitors are ready to bounce.  What caching does is leverage the read-mostly aspect of your website. Instead of running PHP and loading data from the database every time a visitor comes to your site, the cache saves the resulting HTML, JavaScript, images and other elements.  That cache gets stored in RAM, the fastest option for accessing it. Now, when the first person comes to your website, the load time might be a little bit slower for them because the browser has to go through the PHP and database process to generate the HTML and other elements for the cache.  But for the next visit to your website—and all the visits after that—the cache has everything they need. The browser can just go directly into RAM, grab the HTML and show it to the visitor. That gives them the fastest possible load time, which improves user experience. Faster page speeds can improve your SEO, too.  How do you set up a cache for your WordPress site? If you’re only going to install one plugin on your WordPress site, it should be a caching plugin. We recommend WP Super Cache from Automattic. There are other good WordPress caching plugins out there, too. We’ve worked with most of them, and WP Super Cache is the one that’s given us the best results. Step 1 of HostGator’s WP Super Cache guide Downloading a plugin is easy. Configuring it can be confusing without a guide. When you’re ready to install WP Super Cache, check out our support article on how to set it up. It’s a short article that shows you exactly what to check. It also explains how those selections help the plugin work best for your site. Hot Topic #2: How Should You Choose Your Site Theme? There were a lot of questions about website themes at the customer meetup. Obviously, picking a theme is important because it creates the look and feel of your website. But with thousands of themes available, how do you find one that works for you and your business? Here are a few suggestions.  A good theme will fit your content Yes, your theme is important, but your site’s content is more important. Your content is what delivers value to your visitors, keeps them reading and gets them to buy from you or subscribe to your blog.  It’s helpful to start by thinking about your content before you think about a theme. Your content should provide the information your audience wants in a format they can use, whether that’s blog posts, photos, videos or something else. When you understand what kind of content you want on your website, then you can look for a theme that supports it.  A good theme makes your site easy to use Creative content is appealing. Creative site navigation, not so much, because it can confuse users. The easier your site is for visitors to use, the more time they’ll spend on it. A few of the most popular themes at WordPress.org Look for a theme that supports the navigation standards your visitors are going to expect. If you’re not sure that those standards are, go look at your competitors’ sites or other sites in similar industries. A good theme will follow those standards for things like menus, pages, product catalogs and more. A good theme won’t require HTML or CSS changes  Find a theme that gives you the native flexibility to change the things that you want to change, while minimizing the amount of customization that you have to do. If you have to modify a theme’s code to make it work for your site content, you probably want to look for a different solution.  I say this for two reasons. First, modern themes shouldn’t require HTML changes very often, if at all. Second, people who are brand-new to websites and are starting a business need to focus on their business and their site content instead of fiddling with the code of their theme.  And changing theme code isn’t a one-time thing. Every time you change those elements, you have to maintain those changes going forward. As time goes on, you’ll end up spending more time working on your theme and less time working on your content, and content is where your site’s value is going to come from. Try out lots of themes My recommendation would be to try a lot of themes without putting a lot of time into customizing any of them early on. We’ve written a lot about different WordPress themes that can work well for different types of websites, like eCommerce, affiliate marketing, freelancers, small business and many types of blogging. Those blog posts can help you find some options to try. Test them on different devices. Look at them on your phone. Go into the theme’s settings to see what you can change and what you can’t. But resist the urge to tinker with the settings in each theme you try in order to make your content fit.  Identify the right theme for your site When you get a sense of which theme is going to provide you the look you want, the right format for your content and the flexibility that you need, you can tailor that theme to suit your needs.  Hot Topic #3: We’re Here to Help Most HostGator customers want to get a great website up and running for their business, not become accidental web hosting experts as they figure out how to make their site work. That’s why we make the site setup process as simple as possible.  But there’s at least a slight learning curve for everything. Customers at our meetup wanted to know more about how to reach us when they have a question and how we can help. We’ve got many ways for you to get in touch and find the information you need.  You may find your questions answered in our knowledge base. It answers FAQs on domains, design tools, cPanel, security and more.  Our YouTube channel is full of how-to videos and webinars to guide you through basics like file uploads and SSL certificates. You can also find more advanced topics that can help you once your site is up and running, like successful SEO and site traffic statistics. Sometimes, though, you need a real person to guide you through the unknown. We’ve got you.  Live chat help Our live chat team can help you with domains, email, security and more. Many of our customers say they like our live chat because they can copy-paste the information our support team gives them. That creates a transcript that customers can look back on later if they need a refresher.  Phone help with screensharing You can also give us a call if you’re stuck. We may be able to talk through the problem with you. We can do other things too. For example, we have screen-sharing tools you can opt in to, so we can see what you’re looking at on your screen in real time. Then we can walk you step by step through the tasks you want to do. That helps you get your site working the way you want it to faster, so you can get back to your core business. Have more questions about caching, themes or any other element of your site? We’re ready to answer! Find the post on the HostGator Blog

InMotion Hosting Redesigns Website for Trester Demolition

InMotion Hosting Blog -

The web design team at InMotion Hosting has the pleasure of serving many types of businesses at different stages in their web presence journey. The experienced team, which is made up of senior web designers, senior frontend developers, and dedicated project success advisers, has created beautiful, modern designs for businesses looking to establish a brand new site or give a fresh look to an existing site.  Web design trends are constantly changing. While you don’t need to overhaul your website every year, you should make sure your website maintains a fresh, contemporary look. Continue reading InMotion Hosting Redesigns Website for Trester Demolition at InMotion Hosting Blog.

Social Media Content Strategy: How to Respond to a Changing Marketplace

Social Media Examiner -

Do you have a content strategy for your social media marketing? Wondering how content and social media strategies can fit together? To explore how to use content strategically for 2020 and beyond, I interview Jay Baer on the Social Media Marketing Podcast. Jay is a marketing and customer experience strategist. He’s the founder of Convince […] The post Social Media Content Strategy: How to Respond to a Changing Marketplace appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

Getting Started with the Genesis Framework

WP Engine -

This Saturday, the Genesis Framework will celebrate its 10th birthday. That’s a full decade of WordPress websites that have benefited from Genesis, which has been one of the world’s most popular WordPress theme frameworks since it launched.  With the addition of custom post types and custom meta fields in 2010, WordPress was quickly evolving from… The post Getting Started with the Genesis Framework appeared first on WP Engine.

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