Industry Blogs

How to Turn Fans Into Engaged Superfans

Social Media Examiner -

Do you want to improve your fan engagement? Wondering how to turn fans into superfans? In this article, you’ll discover how to encourage your fans to engage with your business in deeper, more meaningful ways. Why Does Fan Engagement Matter to Marketers? Most definitions of brand engagement agree that it represents a relationship between a […] The post How to Turn Fans Into Engaged Superfans appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

How to Use the Instagram Countdown Sticker for Business

Social Media Examiner -

Want to promote time-sensitive events and offers on Instagram? Wondering how the Instagram countdown sticker can help? In this article, you’ll learn how to set up the Instagram countdown sticker in stories, and find four ways to use the sticker for marketing. What Is the Instagram Countdown Sticker? Instagram has long been known for sharing […] The post How to Use the Instagram Countdown Sticker for Business appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

Why Bing Continues to Innovate as a Search Engine – Here’s Why #198

Stone Temple Consulting Blog -

We spend a lot of time focused on innovations at Google, but we should never forget that one of the drivers of innovation is competition. In this episode of our popular Here’s Why digital marketing video series, Eric Enge explains how Bing continues to drive innovation in search engine technology and application.  Don’t miss a single episode of Here’s Why with Mark & Eric. Click the subscribe button below to be notified via email each time a new video is published. Subscribe to Here’s Why Resources SMX Advanced Recap: Bing’s Fabrice Canel keynote See all of our Here’s Why Videos | Subscribe to our YouTube Channel Transcript Mark: Eric, you covered the SMX Advanced keynote of Bing’s Fabrice Canel. Why don’t you start by telling us who he is?   Eric: Fabrice Canel is the Principal Program Manager for Microsoft’s search engine Bing. In particular, his team works on Bing’s abilities to crawl, process and index the web.  Mark: Great. What’s one area of innovation Bing is pursuing these days?  Eric: They’re working to make search more intelligent. For example, they’re getting better at sentiment analysis, a practical application that is giving different results to someone searching for ways in which video games are good for you than for someone who wants to know why they are bad for you.   They’re also serving up more multi-perspective results, realizing that for some queries there’s no one right answer. For example, you’re looking at a Bing featured snippet right now showing articles with opposing viewpoints on video games.  Mark: That’s great, but what about when the user’s query doesn’t contain an obvious sentiment or intent?  Eric: In those cases, Bing is serving up more and more clarifying questions to quickly get to the user’s actual intent. In this example that we’re showing now, the user has just entered “stress management.” Bing responds with a question, ” What do you want to know about this treatment?” And then provides a series of tappable boxes with various approaches to stress management.  Mark: Okay, now we know Google Search is making big strides in the area of artificial intelligence, is Bing working on that too?   Eric: They sure are, but not just in the things that are visible to users. For example, Bing is using AI to build a more intelligent crawler. This is needed because content on the web is just not simple; it may change frequently or be removed or hidden. Bing has to be able to detect and decide what to do with things like duplicate content, JavaScript. CSS, mobile versus desktop presentations, and more.   A particular innovation of this past year was Bing’s announcement of support for Schema implemented in JSON-LD and then support for debugging the same in Bing’s webmaster tools. And, Bing as also extending its support for AMP or the Accelerated Mobile Pages Project.  Mark: It sounds like a lot is going on at Bing and both users and SEOs should not count them out.  Eric: Not at all, and in fact, I’m glad to see that there is still some competition that drives innovation in search.  Don’t miss a single episode of Here’s Why with Mark & Eric. Click the subscribe button below to be notified via email each time a new video is published. Subscribe to Here’s Why See all of our Here’s Why Videos | Subscribe to our YouTube Channel

20 Ways to Promote Max Bounty Affiliate Links and Offers

Grow Traffic Blog -

MaxBounty is one of the largest affiliate networks out there, with thousands of offers you can run to make money. All you need to do is get people to click your links and, depending on the offer, maybe fill out a form or something. It’s not that difficult, but a lot of people just don’t know where to start. What I’ve done here is compiled 20 different ideas for ways you can promote a MaxBounty affiliate offer. You can do a few of them, or a lot of them, or even all of them, though layering all of them on top of one another is likely going to be overkill. Pick and choose a few techniques you can pull off first, then ramp up into others. Broaden your base of offers you promote and start raking in passive income. 1. Make a Good Website I’m putting this “tip” up at the top, but it’s less of an individual technique and more a necessity. Almost every kind of affiliate offer needs some way to promote the offer, and the majority of the time, a simple site with a basic blog and a landing page will do the job. Your website just needs to look good enough to be trustworthy, with enough content that helps push people in the right direction. You don’t need a lot, but you need more than a basic no-theme WordPress.com blog. A simple landing page also serves as a destination for traffic you get from other sources, like social media pages or paid advertising. 2. Make a Facebook Meme Page Well, a Facebook niche page, in any case. A Facebook page is a pretty good way to build up a bit of a community while being able to promote your offers in the descriptions of your posts. Claim a bunch of offers relevant to a specific niche, then create a bunch of content from that niche and start sharing it on Facebook. As long as you can get a foothold in a basic audience, you can start building up traffic. Some of these affiliate pages have hundreds of thousands of followers by now, it’s incredible. You’d be surprised at how well they can perform with minimal effort. 3. Make a Twitter Theme Account Twitter is just as easy to get up and running as Facebook, but it’s a little harder to run affiliate links, simply because you don’t have as much space to work with in every post. You’ll want to get a URL shortener up and running, and get used to doing your hashtag research ahead of time, but you can get a lot of traffic this way. Keep in mind that both Facebook and Twitter are great sources of traffic to your website rather than directly to your affiliate links as well.  Nothing says you need to limit your posts to links to offers, right? Make sure to split your traffic over to your website as well. 4. Make a YouTube Promotion Account A YouTube account that you use to create offer-promoting videos can be surprisingly effective. Just make sure you have a high enough basic video and audio quality, as well as some editing skills. Far too many people go into it with a webcam and a hint of a script; you want to stand out from that pack and be obviously better quality. You can promote your offers directly, or you can hint at your offers and link people to the articles on your site, where you have more space to promote the offers directly. Just don’t expect to earn money directly from YouTube monetization; their requirements for that are way too steep for a casual account now. 5. Write for Free Platforms like HubPages HubPages, EZineArticles and several other free content platforms exist as places you can write authoritative content that refers people back to your main blog. Many of these sites have rules against directly promoting affiliate links in your posts, but not all of them. The point is to write high quality content that will bring authority to your name and to your primary money site. Bringing in traffic is a good benefit as well. It helps SEO, it helps CPA, and it helps you earn money; what’s not to like? 6. Answer Relevant Questions on Quora Quora is a great source of traffic to links. There are a ton of people using it for affiliate promotion, which can be a bit of a pain to wade through. However, most of them are pretty terrible at what they do, so you can easily out-do their posts. Just write in fluent English and pay attention to the actual question being asked and you have a good chance of getting some clicks. 7. Write Individual Offer Reviews on Your Blog The time-honored tradition of “blogging about blogging” is still alive and well. Spin the concept over to affiliate marketing and you have an entire niche that is both quite competitive and quite open. Write blog posts about your individual offers – either the products themselves or how the offers work – and get clicks that way. 8. Write Larger Comparison Articles with Multiple Links One of my favorite techniques for affiliate marketing is to make comparison or top-5 lists. People like to have options, but they also like to see how those options stack up against one another. Build a table with a handful of products you’re promoting, compare them across a few categories, and let your users decide which they want to click on. 9. Create Themed Pinterest Boards with Offers Pinterest is a surprisingly ignored social media platform. It gained an early reputation for focusing entirely on topics like crafting and food, so the tech-focused group usually responsible for writing blogs wrote it off. It’s still around, it’s still huge, and it gets a ton of traffic. Promote your MaxBounty offers there and you’re almost guaranteed to get a good chunk of traffic. 10. Join and Promote (Carefully) on Web Forums Web forums are often niche communities with old and dedicated audiences. If you have a good, relevant offer you can promote to that kind of community, go ahead and join the forum. You can promote it by offering it as a legitimate offer, or by asking if people think it’s legit, or whatever you like. Just don’t swoop in to spam; you’ll likely be banned before anyone clicks the link. 11. Join and Promote in Existing Facebook Groups Facebook groups are similar to web forums, except they’re more open and younger in general. There are also like trillions of them or something, it’s incredible how many groups there are. Anyone can make one, after all. You can browse Facebook groups by searching for keywords and looking at what groups come up. Look for groups with a decently sized userbase and recent posts. You don’t want anything that’s basically dead or that has very stringent moderation, and watch out for anti-affiliate rules. Otherwise, go nuts! Join and post in 2-5 groups per day and you can built up quite a lot of traffic in a few months. 12. Comment on Posts from Large Facebook Pages This one happens pretty often by people who don’t know how to look like a legitimate post. Every blog that has Facebook comments on it has people spamming these form-letter copy-and-paste affiliate links. You don’t want to look like that. Look for relevant posts made by big creators – so there’s a large audience to view it – and leave a comment about your experiences and how your product benefitted you. Remember with this kind of outreach that you’re basically being a salesperson, and you can’t drive people away with your spam. 13. Create a Deals App App development is pretty complicated, but making something that’s basically an interface for showing a user affiliate deals is pretty much the simplest kind of app you can make. Spice it up with an interesting UI and you might even be able to monetize it with some ads. A deals app wouldn’t be too much of an investment to make, and you can keep it loaded with as many affiliate offers as you’re able to sign up for. 14. Leave Good Comments on Relevant Blog Posts We all have to deal with spammy blog comments, so we all know what they look like. You can still use blog comments for marketing purposes, though. Target your blogs carefully and make sure you know what you’re going to promote. In fact, don’t even promote anything the first few times you comment; you need to build up a bit of recognition as a legitimate user before you use this platform for your own marketing. Once you’re a familiar face, you can drop a link and not have it immediately removed. I recommend links to blog posts rather than directly to affiliate offers for this kind of thing. 15. Build a Mailing List Mailing lists are a sort of “advanced” marketing technique for affiliate marketers, because most affiliate marketers aren’t looking at things from a long term perspective. The best affiliate blogs are the ones that provide plenty of good information and insight, tutorials and instructions. You click the links because the information is good. The trouble is, building up a mailing list requires that kind of quality and trust; you need to convince users that they want more of your content. You can’t do that with mediocre spun affiliate posts. If you’re in it for the long game, build a mailing list and offer deals and recommendations through it. 16. Consider Promoting on Reddit The rest of the tips on this list are “consider” tips because they aren’t guaranteed to work, and they could have negative consequences if you do them wrong. All of them except this one, the consequence is “losing money.” This one, it’s getting banned from Reddit. Reddit has a million little subdivisions where different people discuss different topics. If you can find the right subreddit, you may be able to promote an offer and have people click through it. It’s not guaranteed, and in fact a lot of redditors hate this kind of thing, so you have to do it right. I recommend spending some time on Reddit before you try to use it for marketing. That, or just go through their own paid ads system. 17. Consider Paid Facebook Advertising Facebook, again, is a great platform for affiliate marketing, particularly when you can build up an audience. If you’re struggling to get that audience, want to kick-start your growth, or just want to send people through to your website, you can use paid Facebook ads. Facebook ads have a ton of very good targeting options to help you narrow down to the specific audience you want to reach, which is why they can be one of the best platforms to use. 18. Consider Promoted Tweets Twitter ads aren’t as robust or as useful as Facebook ads, but they can be pretty cheap, and all you have to do is be able to tweet in the first place. Set up a promoted tweet once you have one that is getting attention – or “doing numbers,” as they say – and put a little money into it. With luck, you’ll get more than you put in. 19. Consider Google Ads Google ads reach millions of people every day, and you can easily get a slice of that pie. Remember for most of these ad systems, you can’t promote an affiliate link directly. You’re going to need a good landing page, and your targeting should be on point so you don’t waste too much money. 20. Consider Bing Ads Bing is like Google except smaller. The ads system works in much the same way, but you can fairly easily get a $50 ads credit to get you started. Free money turning into more money is never a bad thing, right? The post 20 Ways to Promote Max Bounty Affiliate Links and Offers appeared first on Growtraffic Blog.

Twitter Publisher Dashboard Improves Audience Insights

Social Media Examiner -

Welcome to this week’s edition of the Social Media Marketing Talk Show, a news show for marketers who want to stay on the leading edge of social media. On this week’s Social Media Marketing Talk Show, we explore Twitter announcing new publisher tools, a beta program for upcoming features, and more with special guest Madalyn […] The post Twitter Publisher Dashboard Improves Audience Insights appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

Phrases That Sell: 8 Copywriting Tips

Social Media Examiner -

Want to write marketing copy that moves people to take action? Looking for tips from an expert copywriter? To explore how to create phrases that sell, I interview Ray Edwards, one of the world’s leading copywriters. He’s the author of How to Write Copy That Sells and hosts a podcast called The Ray Edwards Show. […] The post Phrases That Sell: 8 Copywriting Tips appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

How to Monitor Your Social Media Mentions: 5 Listening Tools

Social Media Examiner -

Need help monitoring your company’s mentions on social media? Looking for tools to simplify the process? In this article, you’ll discover five social media monitoring tools to help you better engage online. #1: Enhance Customer Service: Agorapulse Gone are the days when customers would ring up your call center or write you an email to […] The post How to Monitor Your Social Media Mentions: 5 Listening Tools appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

Creating a Customer Community: The Journey, Episode 17, Season 2

Social Media Examiner -

Do your customers love your product? Then watch the Journey, Social Media Examiner’s episodic video documentary that shows you what really happens inside a growing business. Watch The Journey This episode of the Journey explores how Social Media Examiner begins to enable their customers to connect with each other. Watch to see where they find […] The post Creating a Customer Community: The Journey, Episode 17, Season 2 appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

Links as a Ranking Factor – Still Going Strong

Stone Temple Consulting Blog -

In today’s post, I’ll share the results from the fourth of our “Links as a Ranking Factor” studies. We conducted the first of these studies in May 2016 and have been tracking the same query set over time to measure any material shifts in the role of links. In this year’s study, we also looked at different market sectors to see how the role of links may vary by market sector. We have also increased the number of queries we’re examining over time. We did that to make sure that we had enough data for the market sector analyses to be meaningful. The breakout of the month for each of our studies, and the number of queries examined per study, is as follows: May 2016 – 6K queries Aug 2016 – 16K queries May 2017 – 16K queries August 2018 – 27K queries Each of the query data sets includes the original query sets from the earlier studies, so I’ll show an apples-to-apples comparison of those results, as well as the larger-scale results from this year’s study. As a bonus, I’ll also comment on the increase in scope and quality of Moz’ Link Explorer. The Results As with our prior studies, we received the gracious support of Moz by allowing us to access Link Explorer to pull the data for our study. Link Explorer went into Beta in March 2018 and represents an ambitious effort by Moz to expand the size of their index. In short, it looks like they succeeded: For the link study itself, the first set of charts that we will look at are based on the total number of links pointing to the ranking page. For these, we calculated the Quadratic Mean Correlation score. Jump down to the methodology section to see what a “Quadratic Mean Spearman Correlation Score” value actually means. Here is a look at that data for 6K queries across all four instances of the study that we’ve run to date: Note that the same 6,000 queries for this chart were used in all four data sets. While this looks like it shows some level of decline, the reality is that this movement is within normal statistical variance. For all intents and purposes, this already shows a strong correlation between total links to its page and its ranking. Beginning with the second study, we upped the query count to 16,000 queries. We carried that same set of 16K queries through to this year’s edition of the study. Here are the correlation scores for those three datasets of 16K queries: Once again, all three sets show strong results, and the variance is within normal ranges of statistical variance. In this latest version of the study, we updated the query count to 27K queries. This comes in at a solid value as well: One of the more notable findings is that for the first time in all the studies that we’ve done, we see that the Moz DA and the Moz PA are better predictors of ranging than the total link count! The data for this is as follows:   As with prior studies, we compared the total link correlation for commercial and informational queries: Next up, in this year’s study, we evaluated how links might vary as a ranking factor across market segments. In this first view, let’s look at that for commercial queries, divided into Medical, Financial, Technology, and Other segments: This data shows that links are a much bigger ranking factor for financial queries then for other types of queries. Before we draw a final conclusion for that though, let’s also look at a sector analysis for informational queries: Starting with the first study, we also aggregated the normalized link counts (see the methodology section below for an explanation of what that is) by ranking position. The reason this view is important is that relevancy and quality are very large ranking factors, as they should be. In addition, there are many other factors such as Google’s need to show diversity in the SERPs (see the section titled “Why Aren’t the Non-Aggregated Correlation Values Higher?” for more detail on this). In the aggregated link analysis, we get a summarized view of the impact of links spread across a large array of search results. Here is what we saw looking at the 6K query set across all four studies: Here is the data for the 16K query set across the last three studies: Here is the data for the 27K query set for this latest study: In summary, our aggregated view shows a very powerful correlation between links and ranking position.

How to Improve Your YouTube Video Exposure: 6 Useful Tools

Social Media Examiner -

Want more people to watch your YouTube videos? Wondering how to outrank your competitors in YouTube search? In this article, you’ll learn how to use six tools that can help you get the eyeballs you’ve always wanted. #1: Perform Initial YouTube Keyword Research With Keyword Tool Keyword Tool is one of my go-to resources for […] The post How to Improve Your YouTube Video Exposure: 6 Useful Tools appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

5 Facebook Ad Mistakes That Could Be Hurting You

Social Media Examiner -

Are your Facebook ads underperforming? Are you unsure how to get your ads to work better? In this article, you’ll discover five issues that impact Facebook ad performance and how to fix them. #1: You’re Bidding Against Yourself The way Facebook ads work is that you’re in an online auction bidding for the chance for […] The post 5 Facebook Ad Mistakes That Could Be Hurting You appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

How to Create Compelling Instagram Stories: 5 Apps for Marketers

Social Media Examiner -

Do you want to create stronger Instagram story content? Looking for tools to help enhance and edit your stories? In this article, you’ll find five Instagram Stories apps for creating an attractive and engaging story. #1: A Color Story Using eye-catching visuals in your Instagram stories helps keep people engaged with your content. A Color Story, […] The post How to Create Compelling Instagram Stories: 5 Apps for Marketers appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

Why Search Ranking Studies Need Better Interpretation – Here’s Why #197

Stone Temple Consulting Blog -

Many SEOs have become wary of search ranking factor studies. Do they have any value? In this episode of the popular Here’s Why digital marketing video series, Eric Enge explains why they do, IF you are willing to dig deeper and use good principles of data interpretation.  Don’t miss a single episode of Here’s Why with Mark & Eric. Click the subscribe button below to be notified via email each time a new video is published. Subscribe to Here’s Why Resources Ranking Factors Session Recap from SMX 2018 See all of our Here’s Why Videos | Subscribe to our YouTube Channel Transcript Mark: Eric, you covered the ranking factors session at SMX Advanced in 2018. Back in November you and I chatted about the basics of what the panelists shared. Today let’s dig deeper and get into the lessons we can learn from them. Eric: As always, we had a great panel of people sharing from their own testing and experience what they’d observed about search rankings over the past year.   We started with Marcus Tober of SearchMetrics. Marcus took on what has become a really hot issue in SEO and that is correlation studies. These are studies that look for things that correlate highly with higher search engine rankings.   Those studies have come under some fire because well, as we know, correlation doesn’t necessarily mean causation. But some people always jump to conclusions from correlation studies that really aren’t always warranted.   Mark: What did Marcus Tober have to say about all that?    Eric: Marcus thought that there was value in looking closely at microdata usage for certain niches and comparing them to each other. For example, here are his results when comparing sites about dating, recipes, and divorce.   As you can see, there is no clear correlation between the number of microdata integrations and rankings in search, but it is clear that recipe sites use microdata much more than the others.   Mark: Probably because the value to them is clear. I mean, since Google often gives recipe pages special search features triggered by microdata.   Eric: Right, but now look at this graph for three niches and their use of videos. Here, we have two takeaways.   First, fitness sites use way more video than divorce or wine sites. And second, there appears to be a pretty strong correlation for fitness sites between the number of videos they use and getting a top position in search.    Mark: And that might make some sense since people seeking fitness information probably want to see videos about topics like how to do an exercise correctly.  Eric: Right. Marcus also looked at things like the number of paragraphs on a page and the amount of social signals the page had, again, comparing them across several niches. For the former, there was no ranking correlation while for the latter, social signals showed a high correlation, but only for a certain niche where social engagement was more likely than the other niches investigated.   Mark: What should be our takeaway from Marcus Tober’s data?   Eric: I think he did a great job of showing how correlation or even lack of correlation in and of itself doesn’t necessarily tell the whole story. Often, a deeper dive into the data will reveal other possible reasons that show the correlated factor may not necessarily be the reason for the higher ranking.    Next up was Morty Oberstein from Rank Ranger. Morty chose to investigate the rate of change in search results over time. He looked at the top five search results for five niches since 2015.LOL  Within a year, only 27% of the results were the same sites in the same order. And by 2018, that had dropped to 10%.  Mark: A lot of volatility there.   Eric: Yes. He also showed several examples of niches where the change in search results over time seemed to be driven by Google shifting what it saw as the primary intent for a query. That results is what I call ranking slots.   For example, let’s say you have an e-commerce site where you’re able previously to get on the first page for your keyword. But at some point, Google decides that query is more informational than commercial in intent. So they now give four of the top 10 available ranking slots to informational pages. That means your e-commerce page is now competing for just one of six available positions instead of the 10 they were before.   Mark: And how about Jeff Preston from Disney? I think he was the last panelist.  Eric: He was. And Jeff concluded the session with a higher level view on how we interpret data.   He used two very powerful stories from the world of flight navigation technology. The first story was about the tragic Air France flight 447. Flight 447 plunged directly into the Atlantic Ocean because the pilots blindly trusted readings from a broken sensor, and that was not a good result obviously.   In contrast, Jeff told us about a Qantas flight where the cockpit suddenly erupted with 58 error messages and 100 alarms going off all at once. In that situation, the plane landed safely because the pilots ignored the obvious noise and trusted their training instead.   The takeaway for search marketers looking at data is that while data is a great thing, too much data can overwhelm you and give you false conclusions. Sometimes, you have to take a deep breath and lean back into your own testing and experience as well as your awareness of good case studies from other SEO sources you trust.   Don’t miss a single episode of Here’s Why with Mark & Eric. Click the subscribe button below to be notified via email each time a new video is published. Subscribe to Here’s Why See all of our Here’s Why Videos | Subscribe to our YouTube Channel

List of 50+ App Directories to Submit Your Mobile App To

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Developing an app takes a lot of time, energy, and money. When it comes time to launch it, you need to treat it with the respect it deserves. Simply throwing an app up on the Play Store and iTunes won’t cut it. Some older estimates put the number of new apps on just the Google Play store at 1,250 per day, and you can bet it’s even higher now. Forget about standing out from the crowd; it’s a wonder if anyone ever sees you at all. That’s the beauty of the internet, though, right? You’re not limited to just one platform. You can put your app up on the store, and then you can submit your app or its store listing to directories for reviews, for promotion, and for user ranking. No one directory is going to have even a fraction of the traffic of the main three stores (iTunes, Google, and Amazon), but they have a much higher engagement rate. The only question is, where should you submit your app? Here’s a huge list of directories and assorted app-focused sites for your consideration. Note: I make no claims as to the viability of submitting your app to any of these directories. They all have their own means of contact, their own requirements to be reviewed, and their own themes. Some of them may have a fee for submission; it’s up to you to decide if that’s worthwhile. AppAdvice – A site with a series of regularly published lists that collect apps based around certain themes, like apps for beer lovers or apps for movie fans. AppShopper – An app toplist that monitors prices and allows people to mark if they own or want to buy an app, to watch for price drops. Touch Arcade – A gaming-focused site that covers mobile apps as well as games for the Nintendo Switch. Excellent if you have a game to submit. Apptism – An app directory that displays apps by icon with rating, platform, and pricing information for users to browse. App Addict – An app and mobile device blog that reviews apps and various mobile devices and accessories. App Apes – An app review site that allows a wide variety of apps, though they tend to focus mostly on games. AppChatter – An app directory that produces daily app reviews as well as articles on how to use certain advanced apps or use apps for specific tasks. App Saga – A site that focuses on free apps, though it counts apps that are only free temporarily if they’re good enough. iOS specific, as far as I can tell. App Safari – An app directory focusing entirely on iOS apps, covering anything that can go on an apple device, whether it’s the newest iPhone or an old iPod. 101 Best – A constantly-evolving directory of the top 101 apps for Android. Submitting an app allows it to be reviewed and placed on the daily, weekly, monthly, and all time lists. AppModo – A site dedicated to mobile devices and everything about them, from quirks in the YouTube app to toplists for new apps. FeedMyApp – A directory with app reviews and some longer, more in-depth articles about specific apps or about specific tasks and the apps that assist. GetApp – An app search engine that focuses on business-focused apps. Submit yours to the directory to appear as recommendations for your task. Netted – A site by Webby’s, this general tech and mobile blog has sections dedicated to Android, iOS, and Tablet apps. Phandroid – Another directory with a variety of app reviews, posted fairly regularly. They also maintain several evolving toplists. GameZebo – A multi-platform app directory specializing in games. If you have a game, usually a free game, you can submit it here. Android Guys – A site focused on all things android, from reviews of games to the best choice of cellular providers to reviews of new devices. AppsZoom – An Android-focused app directory. You probably won’t show up on the front page, but you can show up in searches for specific categories. TouchMyApps – A relatively small and somewhat personal app-focused blog, the owner reviews and ranks apps but doesn’t post all that frequently. RazMag – A publication by RazorianFly, this magazine is highly focused on apps that provide a certain aesthetic or experience to the user, specifically to the founder. FreeAppsArcade – An app directory that focuses entirely on the games vertical. There are a lot of different apps to view, so submit yours. Easy App Finder – A directory that helps users find apps in specific categories that aren’t your usual categories, like “dice games” and “fisherman apps” among others. AndroLib – An app directory that focuses on both free and paid Android apps, with ranking and pricing information available up front. AppSpy – One of the more well-done app review sites, this one is quite active and does detailed reviews and price monitoring. AppleNApps – An iOS focused app directory that maintains top 100 lists and daily app lists. Don’t let the trending bar fool you, it’s an active site. BestAppsForKids – An app directory with a very specific focus on apps that are mainly aimed at children, meaning they don’t have in-app purchases, they’re cute and not violent, and they’re child appropriate. AppPicker – An app directory with a very perfunctory blog stapled on, largely aimed at apps that have discounts to make them free. The iMums – Another child-focused app directory run by a handful of moms. App developers are encouraged to submit apps to this Australian blog. AppsMirror – Another broad-spectrum app review and top list site. You can submit apps to their directory quickly and easily. AlphaDigits – An app directory with a fairly large audience, though it might not look like it at first glance. They tend to write fairly detailed reviews and sometimes tutorials. To take a bit of a break from basic directories, here are a few other kinds of sites you can submit your app to for potential review. These sites tend to have much larger audiences, but also less of a chance to get in if your app isn’t stellar. For many of them, you won’t be able to submit an app directly; submit the release of your app as a tip to their writers. Mashable – The tech section of Mashable often covers apps, though you need to be worth noting in some way to be noticed. Make sure your app is top-tier and submit it as a tip. TechCrunch – TC often covers apps in a wide variety of categories, but again, you need to have a very noteworthy or newsworthy app to be featured in one of their posts. Cult of Mac – As the name would imply, this site covers all things Apple, including iOS apps. If you have a good app you want them to check out, submit it. 9to5 Mac – Another Apple-focused news site that will happily cover iOS apps if you have a good one and get it to them the right way. Wired – Wired is one of the biggest tech sites in the world, and they definitely cover apps, but they require a real good reason to do so. They won’t just publish a press release about your new asset-flip game, you need a good app. LifeHacker – If your app can be used in a life hack, regardless of how upscale or bizarre the life hack may be, you can try submitting it here. They might decide it’s fun enough to pick up and write about. MakeUseOf – This site tends to focus more on apps that can be used for specific purposes, to the point that they publish as many tutorials as they do reviews. If you have a great unique task app, this is a great place to send it. CNet – CNet does app reviews, though they tend to focus on apps with a big presence behind them or otherwise with a good reason to be reviewed. PCMagazine – PC Mag will review apps, though they tend to pass games over to their companion site, PC Gamer. Tech apps are generally more appreciated. VentureBeat – If you have a powerful app or something with a lot of funding behind it, VentureBeat has you covered. They tend to focus on newsworthy apps, but you might be able to slip in with something that’s just really good. GeekWire – You know the drill by now; high end tech site, occasional app reviews, need a good reason to feature them. Worth sending in a tip, at least. Android Central – One of the largest Android-focused blogs out there, you can get some good features about your app by submitting it. PocketGamer – Another game-focused app review and ranking site. This one also has a lot of spin-off sections for news, guides, and reviews, so it’s good to get featured. EuroGamer – Another gaming-focused site, only submit your app here if it’s related to gaming in some way, otherwise they probably won’t give you the time of day. Bonus if you’re a European dev. Mac Rumors – Another of the main Mac-focused blogs out there, they don’t cover every app that comes their way, but they’ll be fairly amenable to iOS only apps. Gizmodo – One of the largest mobile-focused sites out there, there’s a lot of content on the site, but they’ve had a bit of a questionable time of it. You can submit your app and see if they’ll review it. Slashdot – News for nerds, you can submit your app here but be aware that they will be quite unforgiving if you give them something terrible. BoingBoing – A pop culture blog that covers a lot of stuff off the beaten path. You can get good coverage if you’re something atypical in some way. Digital Trends – You can get a lot of good coverage for an app here, though you probably want something that’s cutting edge in some way. Ars Technica – You know it, you love it, another high end blog! Submit your app and if it’s great, they’ll give it some coverage. If not, you’ll probably never hear back. Now let’s round out this post with a few other kinds of app view venues. Primarily, YouTube channels. These channels often review apps, so you can get some coverage if you send a copy to the creator. Be sure to check if they have a specific press email or anything first! Nathaniel Reichert – This guy posts weekly videos covering a variety of app-related topics, from app reviews to how to use a mouse and keyboard with yur mobile device and much more. Android Critics – This isn’t a very high-content channel but it does post lists about apps. They aren’t always good reviews – sometimes it’s lists of dangerous apps – but it can be worth submitting. Dave Bennett – Dave is a verified channel where he talks about a lot of different kinds of tech, where apps are just one part of it. iBertz – Another verified channel with over 200K subscribers, he covers an array of different kinds of tech, including the occasional app. Android Authority – The site has its own YouTube channel with three million subscribers. They cover apps as well as Android tech news. Explore Gadgets – Another mobile-focused channel with half a million subscribers. They review apps fairly often. SakiTech – Another mobile channel, this one has half a million subscribers as well. Give it a look and shoot them your app. AppFind – This channel posts weekly videos for your perusal. Some are on hidden features or cool uses of tech, while others review apps. Device Customizer – They only post one video a month on average, but they frequently cover cool apps in lists that do reasonably well. Tech Avenue – A channel that reviews apps and posts top ten lists fairly regularly; worth giving a shot if you have something to contribute. So there you have it; 60 different places you can send your app to maybe get it reviewed or shared in a directory. The post List of 50+ App Directories to Submit Your Mobile App To appeared first on Growtraffic Blog.

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Welcome to this week’s edition of the Social Media Marketing Talk Show, a news show for marketers who want to stay on the leading edge of social media. On this week’s Social Media Marketing Talk Show, we explore insights and research to reveal best practices for Facebook, LinkedIn, and more in 2019. Our special guest […] The post Social Media Best Practices for 2019: Insights and Research From Industry Leaders appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

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Social Media Examiner is hiring a Director of Marketing! We are looking for experienced candidates who are willing to work from our home offices in Poway, California. To apply, you must have at least 7 years of experience directing a team of online marketers. Extensive knowledge of email marketing, Facebook advertising, affiliate marketing, social media […] The post We’re Hiring: Director of Marketing appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

10 Social Media Marketing Tools to Improve Your Results

Social Media Examiner -

Looking for a few powerful tools to improve your social media marketing results? In this article, you’ll discover 10 tools to help with social listening, content creation, and campaign management. Research and Listening Tools Content is nothing without direction. Research and listening tools give you vital information and analysis regarding the best content topics and […] The post 10 Social Media Marketing Tools to Improve Your Results appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

When Marketing Doesn’t Work: The Journey, Season 2, Episode 16

Social Media Examiner -

Ever been in a situation where none of your marketing seems to work? Then watch the Journey, Social Media Examiner’s episodic video documentary that shows you what really happens inside a growing business. Watch The Journey This episode of the Journey explores how Social Media Examiner faces constant challenges. The marketing department wants to target […] The post When Marketing Doesn’t Work: The Journey, Season 2, Episode 16 appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

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