Industry Blogs

3 Types of Social Video That Work for Any Business

Social Media Examiner -

Want to add more video to your social media marketing? Wondering how other businesses use video? In this article, you’ll discover three types of video that work for any business on IGTV, Twitter, and LinkedIn. Why Social Video Matters to Your Business According to a 2019 survey by Wyzowl, 87% of marketers see video as […] The post 3 Types of Social Video That Work for Any Business appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

Instagram Creator Accounts: What Marketers Need to Know

Social Media Examiner -

Do you want more tools to connect with your audience on Instagram? Have you heard about Instagram creator accounts? In this article, you’ll learn how switching to an Instagram creator account can help you better achieve your Instagram marketing goals. What Is an Instagram Creator Account? When Instagram first launched, everyone had a personal account. […] The post Instagram Creator Accounts: What Marketers Need to Know appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

Facebook Ad Relevance Score Updates: What Marketers Need to Know

Social Media Examiner -

Have you noticed a change in Facebook ad relevance scores? Wondering what the three new Facebook ad relevance diagnostics tell you? In this article, you’ll learn how to use Facebook ad relevance diagnostics to improve your advertising campaigns. What Changed With Facebook Ad Relevance Metrics? Facebook’s relevance score is an assessment based on how well […] The post Facebook Ad Relevance Score Updates: What Marketers Need to Know appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

How to Optimize Your PPC Campaign for Subscription Websites

Grow Traffic Blog -

Running a PPC campaign is always tricky business. You’re walking a razor’s edge, where to fall on one side means profitable advertising, and the other means a huge money sink. It’s tricky to set up, tricky to test, and tricky to monitor in a way that you can use to optimize your results. When it comes to selling a subscription service, it gets even harder to track and monitor in an appropriate way. It’s a simple reason, too: subscriptions aren’t a single fee, so you have to track more data and manage more numbers to have appropriate ROI calculations. That’s what I’ll discuss first, because it’s so important. Subscription ROI Here’s a scenario for you. You’re re-selling a subscription service that costs the user $11 per month, with your offer discount. You want to run some PPC ads, but when you set up targeting for your demographic, costs end up running you $25 per click. Do you run these ads? How do you know what the answer is? The solution is something called Expected Lifetime Value. Calculating the lifetime value of a customer, and the average across all of your customers, allows you to then calculate whether or not such advertising is worthwhile. Some customers, of course, are going to be dissatisfied and cancel after one month. The lifetime value of that customer is $11. Some customers are going to use your service for a few months, maybe six, before they cancel it. Maybe they outgrew it, maybe they wanted a change, maybe their business folded and they don’t need it any more. Their average lifetime value might be, say, $66. Some customers are going to be life-long advocates and hugely loyal users. Your service has only been around for two years, and they have two years of subscription under their belts. The lifetime value of these customers, at $11 per month, is over $250 and rising. How many customers are in each category? That’s what you need to find out, if you want to calculate the average lifetime value for your audience as a whole. Actually calculating lifetime value is a simple calculation. Figure out how many customers your service has and how long each one has been a customer. You already know the cost of a month of service, so you simply need to calculate the average number of months a user remains a customer. In our hypothetical situation, with a subscription costing $11 per month and a click costing $25 per month, you’re looking for an average customer value of at least $25 to break even. That’s 2.5-3 months of service on average. There are other details to monitor, of course. All of those customers who cancel after a month are dragging down your average. Do you have a way to differentiate them in your targeting, or do you need to include them in your calculations? This all gets more complex when you have to consider different tiers of service. If your subscription service has a $5/mo plan, an $11/mo plan, and a $20/mo plan, you have tricky calculations to do involving average purchase value as well as subscription length. Additionally, you may want to see if you can target explicitly the kinds of people who buy the high tier plans rather than the low tier plans when you run your ads. Hubspot’s guide to LTV is a good resource, though it doesn’t deal explicitly with subscription models. Still, it calculates the average value of a purchase and the average number of purchases in a customer’s lifespan, so you can adapt those numbers to reflect subscription models. Only once you know the average value of your customers, can you identify what point your PPC ads become profitable. Ideally, it will be a price you can afford. From there, you need to optimize your ads from every angle you can, which is what the rest of this post is going to help you with. Optimizing Your PPC Campaigns Optimizing a PPC campaign for a subscription service isn’t really any different from optimizing a campaign for a single-sale storefront. You always have an expected value for your customers, and you always have a cost per click, so you need to optimize your click rates and your conversion rates. Here are tips for how you can do it. Build a strong foundation. A foundation in this case is your account structure. It’s very easy to lose track of organization while you’re building up ads, and then you have a jungle where you should have a lawn. Ask yourself some questions: How many keywords are you using in each ad group? How many individual ads are you running in each ad group? How relevant are the keywords to each other and to the ads in each ad group? You generally want your ad groups to be tight groupings of appropriate, relevant keywords within your niche, with ads making use of this relevance in a narrow context. For example, if you have a content marketing service, you might be advertising your content marketing, or your content production, or your writing, or your outreach, and each of these can be their own groups. Always make sure your ad campaigns are as organized as possible, and if it doesn’t make sense to add a new keyword to a group, make a new group and expand it from there. Identify and focus on high performance keywords. Very often, your ad groups will have up to a dozen or even more keywords in them, so you want to drill down occasionally to see how those keywords are performing individually. You’re looking for keywords with a high quality score and a high click-through rate. Conversely, you probably want to identify and cut out keywords that have the opposite issues. If you’ve found some keywords to run but those keywords have an abysmal click rate, you should drop them before they cost you more money. If your research tells you that those keywords SHOULD be performing well, you should look for other reasons why they might not be working. Use a tiered bidding strategy. This is something WordStream covers in this article in quite a bit of detail. Basically, when you find a good keyword, you run an ad targeting that keyword with each of the four match types at the same time. They will have different costs and can get you different results, which both gives you more performance and an idea of how to properly use those keywords moving forward. Constantly grow your negative keywords list. This is another WordStream special, because they have a great write-up on negative keywords. In case you don’t know what they are, negative keywords are keywords you add to an advertisement to make it NOT appear when those keywords are involved. For example, if you’re a shoe store and you’re selling only dress shoes, you might include negative keywords like “athletics” and “running” to exclude people search for running shoes. After all, if someone searching for running shoes sees your ad and clicks through, they’ll find that you don’t sell what they want. That means you paid for a click that can’t possibly convert. Negative keyword lists should be a growing and evolving set of lists. You want a general list to maintain for every ad, but you also want to expand lists for ads based on their performance. If you see that people are clicking through your shoe ad on queries for rock climbing shoes because you used “shoes” as a broad match keyword, you can then add rock climbing to your negative list. Make sure you’re running your tests for an appropriate length of time. You need data on your keywords before you can make decisions about them. You get that data in one of two ways: letting them run for a longer time, or dumping more money into them to get more volume. Generally, with daily budget caps and spending limits, it’s better to let them run for longer. You almost never want to cut off your keywords if they’ve run for less than a week. Personally, I aim for about 10 days, unless a keyword is obviously garbage before that point, or vice versa. You need enough data to make a decision, and for low volume keywords it can take a while to get that data. Look for reasons an underperforming keyword is underperforming. The three main causes are low bids, low search volumes, and improper match type. If you’re using tiered matching, the third one drops out. Low bids are easy enough to fix. You may have put in some keywords with penny bids to try to get cheap traffic, or to use them as placeholders. Don’t forget to increase your bids slowly until they catch and start running. As far as low search volume, that’s simply something you need to check and experiment with. If a keyword that looks good doesn’t have enough clicks, pause it. In fact, don’t be afraid to pause keywords that aren’t performing up to your standards. You can make adjustments and try again, or you can cut them off entirely and focus your efforts elsewhere. Always make sure your ads are maximally relevant. If you have a lot of various keywords that focus on different aspects of your service, it’s a good idea to create specific focused landing pages for each of them as well. If one focuses on how cheap the service is, sending them to a landing page talking about a bunch of the upsells they can’t afford isn’t a good way to go about it. Don’t be afraid to make more variations in both ads and landing pages. The whole point is to be as relevant as possible to the audience who sees the ad, so there’s as little disjointedness between the ad and the landing page as possible. One of the number one mistakes I see businesses, even big businesses, making is that they use a generic one-size-fits-all landing page for every ad. Instead of five ads with a quality score of 7 leading to one generic landing page, make five ads each with a quality score of 9 pointing at individualized landing pages. Make use of remarketing whenever possible. One of your best target audiences is “people who are already interested but didn’t convert initially.” Remarketing lists allow you to capture these people and market to them with separate ads later. The fact is, a huge portion of your initial clicks are going to come from people who are interested, but who are not in the right situation to subscribe immediately. They might not have their financial information on hand, or they might not want to plug it in via a phone. They might want to discuss a purchase with a boss or with a family member first. Whatever the reason, those people are just as likely to forget about it than to remember and come back. That’s why you need to remarket. Make use of advanced features whenever possible. There are a lot of useful little features you can get with Google, both in organic search results and paid search extensions. Here are some of them you may consider: Google search extensions, which are those sub-links for search results that can give users specific sub-pages to go to directly. Ad Extensions, which are specific formats and improvements to ads through Google that can give you additional links or call to action methods. Those are just what Google offers. Other ad networks have their own quirks and advanced features that can be very useful once you get to learn how they work. The post How to Optimize Your PPC Campaign for Subscription Websites appeared first on Growtraffic Blog.

Why Pagination is Important – Here’s Why #215

Stone Temple Consulting Blog -

Google’s John Mueller confirmed that Google has not made use of rel=prev/next tags for some time. But should we still implement pagination? In this episode of the award-winning Here’s Why digital marketing video series, Eric Enge explains why pagination is still important and how you should implement it.  Don’t miss a single episode of Here’s Why. Click the subscribe button below to be notified via email each time a new video is published. Subscribe to Here’s Why Resources Pagination Canonicalization & SEO: Your Technical Guide See all of our Here’s Why Videos | Subscribe to our YouTube Channel Transcript So recently, Google’s John Mueller tweeted that Google has not made use of rel=prev/next tags for some time. But my assessment is that the reason they did this is because the quality of the tagging web developers were using was probably poor on average. This is actually a parallel to what happened with rel=author tags back in 2014, when Google discontinued support for those. Back at that time, we actually did a study on how well those were implemented by people at the time. We’ll share that in the show notes below. This study shows that 71% of the sites with prominent readership made no attempt to implement authorship or implemented it incorrectly. Many of those who had implemented it didn’t understand exactly how to do it and they just got it wrong. That said, what should we do to support paginating page sequences now? If you have prev/next tags, you could still use them on your page if you want. Google won’t use them. Bing might use them—we don’t actually know for sure. But if you are going to keep them on your pages, make sure they are implemented correctly. You do have to take the time to learn how to follow the specs carefully and get it right. Putting aside the prev/next tags for a moment, let’s think about how you should implement pagination otherwise on your page. Our first preference is to implement that pagination in clean HTML tags that are visible in the source code for the pages on your site—something that is easy for the search engines to parse. The second choice would be to implement it in a way that isn’t clinging to the source code, but you can actually see it in the DOM or the Document Object Model. That means that your links are going to be anchor tags with a valid href attribute, not span or button elements with attached JavaScript click events. Paginated pages should also canonical to themselves—that’s a good reinforcing signal. These are the things that you need. The reason why this is still important is that pagination is something that still matters to users. If you’ve got 200 products in a particular category, you probably don’t want to show 200 products on one single page. Breaking that up into many pages is actually a very good way to make the content more parsable and readable and usable for users. This is really why pagination is still important. But make sure you get that pagination implemented the correct way as I’ve outlined in today’s video. Don’t miss a single episode of Here’s Why. Click the subscribe button below to be notified via email each time a new video is published. Subscribe to Here’s Why See all of our Here’s Why Videos | Subscribe to our YouTube Channel

Facebook Pixel to Become Less Effective for Marketers

Social Media Examiner -

Welcome to this week’s edition of the Social Media Marketing Talk Show, a news show for marketers who want to stay on the leading edge of social media. On today’s show, we explore the ramifications of Facebook’s upcoming Clear History tool and Instagram expanding Stories into the Explore tab with special guests, Jenn Herman and […] The post Facebook Pixel to Become Less Effective for Marketers appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

How to Use IGTV for Marketers

Social Media Examiner -

Wondering how to use IGTV (Instagram TV) for marketing? Looking for a successful use case? To explore IGTV and how it can help your business, I interview Jasmine Star. Jasmine is an Instagram expert, professional photographer, and business strategist. She’s the founder of Insta 180, an online course on using Instagram for business, and she […] The post How to Use IGTV for Marketers appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

Top Takeaways from Next10x Digital Marketing Conference 2019

Stone Temple Consulting Blog -

On May 2, 2019, Perficient Digital hosted the third annual Next10x conference in Boston. The one-day agenda was packed with relevant, valuable digital marketing and SEO information and networking breaks. It included 12 industry speakers and had a strong focus in two areas: The future of digital marketing Things that you can do right now to grow your business Many of the industry’s top speakers came and shared their knowledge, expertise and insights. Didn’t get a chance to join us this year? No worries – today’s post will provide you with a recap of the top takeaways from the day. Sign me up to stay in the loop about Next10x 2020 Top 5 SEO Opportunities Eric Enge, General Manager, Digital Marketing, Perficient Digital SEO is about giving Google what they want — a great user experience based on intent. Our learnings from the algorithm updates show that consistent updates raise the rankings of sites that meet user intent. It’s in our interest as publishers to align with Google’s goals. As a result, here are the five biggest opportunities for SEO in 2019: High-quality content – Google recognizes that user needs are complex and unique to each use, and its algorithm updates are focused on surfacing sites that offer a depth and breadth of content likely to satisfy those needs. In short, publishing high volumes of content (when compared to competition) can cause your organic search traffic to soar. Promote content effectively – You can have the world’s greatest web site, but you won’t get much traffic if no one knows about it. Promote your site, drive high levels of visibility to what you’ve created, and get cited and referenced across the web. Links still matter a great deal, and they remain a big key to SEO success. Speed matters – A one-second mobile delay can reduce conversions by up to 20%, and 53% of users abandon pages that take more than three seconds to load. Yet, the average page takes more than 12 seconds to load on mobile. Find ways to speed up your site and you’re likely to see great results. One approach to consider is to implement accelerated mobile pages (AMP), a progressive web app (PWA), or both (a PWAMP!). Publish original, high-quality images – Searching with a camera is the next big phase of search. Original, large, clean, and optimized images directly related to the site will offer users a better experience with your content and open the door to new traffic opportunities, such as traffic from Google Discover. Invest in voice – Users are becoming more and more comfortable speaking to their devices. Personal assistants will be the driving applications behind voice usage. As a publisher, the biggest opportunities are for those who create personal assistant apps, such as an Alexa Skill or an Actions on Google app. These will advance from the scripted conversations available today to fully cognitive conversations. Make Your Mobile Site Fly with AMP Ben Morss, Developer Advocate, Google Speed is everything. It matters to users across the globe. It is even more critical in a world where most users have 3G connections or slower (40% of connections worldwide are 2G). Here in the U.S., delays in page load times significantly impact user engagement and conversions on your site. AMP is an open source program that provides an industry-standard approach to speeding up your pages. Based on a collection of web components built off HTML, AMP provides some JavaScript functionality like menus and image carousels. AMP also includes these key aspects: AMP discourages/bans features that slow speed, provides a stable layout that eliminates distracting ads, and only loads content when it’s needed. Originally, site owners that adopted AMP created an HTML/JavaScript version of their site and then an AMP version that was used as an alternate mobile experience. Today, more and more implement AMP as the standard (and only) version of their mobile pages. In general, most sites can largely be re-created in AMP, which can support visually rich experiences. Some exceptions remain but are rare. Checkout pages are one of the few pages that still usually require too much JavaScript to translate to AMP pages. Ben shared a case study of an e-commerce site in India that saw a 60% improvement in speed and a 40% reduced bounce rate. PWAs create an app-like experience on the web, and adoption of these is spreading. Microsoft is actively looking for PWAs to feature in their app store and Chrome has started launching PWAs for PCs, with Macs hopefully soon to follow. Consider the key aspects of PWAs: If your site is developed with a PWA, your normal web pages behave like a smartphone app when accessed via your phone, eliminating the need to develop a separate code experience for phones. This drives rapid adoption — since all users who access your site get the PWA, maintenance and development are simplified. A core component of the PWA is the Service Worker, which actively preloads content prior to a user requesting it. As a result, the page they access next is often preloaded onto their phone even before they request it, resulting in great increases in speed. The Future is Conversational and Visual Duane Forrester, VP of Industry Insights, Yext Trends are driven by platform change. It’s important to have these new devices and platforms in your life to understand how users are searching and what content they are consuming. Smart speakers and personal assistants are integrating with everyday life, including in houses, cars, and during a user’s day-to-day routine. Your brand has numerous audiences and consumer touchpoints. Search engines want consistent and reliable data across touchpoints to determine how to serve up a reasonable and expected answer. Seventy-three percent of high-intent traffic (someone intending to enter a business/make a purchase) happens off-site. Most customers never visit a homepage because search intent takes them to other channels and specific landing pages. It’s important to manage entities (companies, events, people) as users become more thoughtful about their spending power. The customer journey usually begins with a question, but it involves a series of questions and answers before the goal is completed. As a result, search is moving from keywords to questions. Developing a questions catalog can help drive content creation to enable your business to be a part of the conversation. To be a trusted and valued brand, businesses must structure data across entities and platforms and provide answers for all stages of this journey. Knowledge graphs are key for a business to develop an authentic relationship with consumers. Using “best” in a query automatically filters out any business with less than a four-star rating, so cleaning up and responding to feedback is more critical than ever. The world is having a conversation, whether you’re in it or not. It’s best to be in it. For example, do you look at your reviews? Do you respond to the bad ones and try to resolve the issue? Conversations are more authentic. An organization must understand the complex intent behind questions and get to what the user means to better advertise to a group. This is especially effective when you overlay demographic data — one of the things that makes psychographic marketing on Facebook so interesting. Spicy Content Marketing that Warms Up Cold Calls Chris Brogan, CEO, Owner Media Group It’s critical for marketers to put humanity back into content. Attention is at an all-time low because of the junk content cluttering the space, especially for email marketers. Over 2,000 words may get you linked and bookmarked, but quick content gets you actions. As a result, it’s important to match the content you produce to the user needs you’re trying to address and the results you hope will come from it. Two types of users exist – browsers and searchers. Both start their query because of an event, followed by awareness, and then an evaluation of the results. Marketers need to get smarter about the customer journey and recognize that trying to reach the masses won’t reach anyone. Instead, we need to go after multiple specificities. For example, consider Microsoft’s Super Bowl ad about disabled gamers. It is very targeted, yet has broad audience appeal at the same time. At the heart of this type of approach is understanding that specificity makes us take an interest because we feel connected. In addition, email marketing needs to be worth forwarding and worth keeping in an inbox. Don’t waste the opportunity of a newsletter with poorly planned content — make sure it resonates. Don’t send it from inhuman email addresses that shut down conversation (donotreply@ addresses). Invite the responses and respond back to them. Create a conversation. When reviewing content, don’t just focus on the technical aspects of writing like grammar, word count, and links. Review the content for tribalism and consider the social flux. Speak to audiences that are developing their voices when you have a compelling reason. Business is about belonging — fitting in is what you do when you don’t belong. In terms of creating a connection, video is underutilized and underappreciated: People read, on average, 19 minutes a day. On average, they spend six hours online consuming content, but text is no longer a driver. Video puts a human face in front of human faces. Panel: Case Studies This panel had four speakers covering several different topics: Susan Wenograd, Account Group Director, Aimclear Grant Davies, Agency General Manager, Perficient Digital Jordan Silton, Director of SEO Marketing, Apartments.com Shawn Tyler, Senior Director of Marketing, SEO, Affiliate and Social, BOLD Brand Awareness Case Study Susan Wenograd, Account Group Director, Aimclear Aimclear tried to prove the impact of a Facebook video ad campaign on brand awareness by testing a two-market strategy for six weeks. For this test, they determined the measurement for increased awareness would be a lift in traffic. The test focused on scalable tactics for the travel vertical for two cities, one of which would operate as a control group. The client created how-to videos with long wind ups that achieved an average watch of two seconds. Aimclear provided aspirational videos rooted in the emotions of travel and received an average watch time of 10 seconds. Aimclear scaled the project and achieved a 41% lift year over year (YoY) for the test group over the control group. The emotional connection helped with engagement that stimulated a retargeting campaign featuring product details. The key is to capture attention in the first couple of seconds. Mobile Case Study Grant Davies, General Manager, Perficient Digital Apps account for 80% of time spent on mobile devices. Businesses are doing the work to get users to their mobile experiences but aren’t emphasizing work to keep them there. Fifty percent of consumers are put off by a bad mobile experience, and 40% will turn to a competitor after a bad mobile experience. Grant shared a rental equipment case study that found a change in user needs within their industry. His team found that users wanted to make phone calls and talk to a person rather than go through an app. Once this was realized, new ways to chat and personalized features, like active notifications and chatbots, were developed. Identifying the actual needs of the consumers changed the way the business prioritized work.   Grant also added some thought on the future of mobile: We will see more microtransactions from users that are willing to sell data when properly informed of the use and personal benefits. There will be improved accessibility for those with disabilities. Healthcare services will increasingly leverage mobile. Voice assistants with actual intelligence will emerge. Contextual Linking Case Study Jordan Silton, Director – SEO Marketing, Apartments.com Apartments.com is a large and complex site with many opportunities for natural interactions between their pages. Yes, the problem of implementing contextual linking was a tough one – it’s hard to do it in an easily scalable way. Using artificial intelligence (AI), Apartments.com created a scalable method for adding accurate, quality links to test. The method correctly identified entities and the correct links, but the cost to parse the content wasn’t scalable. Apartments.com couldn’t easily prioritize entities that mattered to them. As a result, Apartments.com started with a database of their entities. They used regular expressions to match entities within content with content to link to. This method allowed them to effectively narrow down on local entities and the content they were linking to. Using this method, the contextual links on their site update automatically. Takeaways from the experience: Data science is key. Simple solutions can be more effective. When you dream big and push the envelope, you find your most creative solution and accomplish more. Managing a Mature Product Case Study Shawn Tyler, Senior Director of Marketing, SEO, Affiliate and Social, BOLD Shawn shared an enterprise’s approach to assessing and evolving a mature online property. His presentation focused on years of building up a successful site – when some of the strategies stop working, how can you change direction without risking what is still working well? Some key takeaways were: Realizing that catching and strategically addressing technical errors is essential. Utilizing multiple tools to track and differentiate their properties is important. This helps prioritize what content to emphasize or devalue and collect and evaluate backlinks. The need to stablish KPIs across sites and develop content and technical QA processes. Technical SEO and How It Can Benefit Your Business Martin Splitt, Developer Advocate, Google Technical SEOs are the link between developer and marketer. They need to understand the challenges of developers and investment interests of marketers to help both achieve their goals. Some key aspects of this include: Supporting development teams so they are thinking about SEO when you are not in the room and can keep pace in an agile workflow. Testing and monitoring for technical issues to build a strong foundation rather than after the fact. This is more costly and time intensive than catching issues early on. Advocating for site performance in a sea of competing priorities. Sixty-six percent of customers judge a company based on website performance. The four most important aspects of technical SEO: Be discoverable This comes down to good links (use the <a> tag) and limited JavaScript – if the JavaScript fails or connectivity is lost during load, it will ruin the link. Parsers can understand JavaScript links but can’t run them. Knowing when to use buttons vs. links. If it takes the user to different content, use a link. The History API runs code when URLs change. This helps to avoid tricking browsers with fragment identifiers. Be crawlable Crawl budget is based on crawl rate, and demand is determined by the server. Changes to the server include migrations and changing pages. Crawlability has nothing to do with ranking. Update your robot.txt file very carefully. Be indexable Googlebot understands JavaScript but processes it in a deferred manner. Using semantic HTML markup helps search engines understand the page. Make sure you’re making a reasonable number of requests. Reduce render-blocking JavaScript. If the JavaScript comes before the content in the code, search engines must download and execute the JavaScript before it, or the users, can understand the page content. Be usable An obvious title and snippets are a must. Website performance and mobile friendliness must be a priority. Use tools to verify this. Measure speed by the time it takes to load the content users have come to the site to find. Understand the limitations of your framework. Panel: Demystifying Analytics This panel had two speakers: Kathryn Bogen, Analytics Director for Perficient Digital Jenny Halasz, Founder, CEO for JLH Marketing. Analytics Governance and Documentation Kathryn Bogen, Analytics Director, Perficient Digital Some of the top requirements for a successful analytics program include: Expertise to understand tools and resources. Centralized tracking to promote accuracy. Constantly onboarding new talent and tools. Learning to trust the tools and the data they collect. Reducing reliance on development and deployment. Since the number of people involved in analytics programs is often small, even at large enterprises, one of the biggest challenges these organizations face is staff turnover. As a result, the approaches used, specifics of how things are setup, needs of the stakeholders receiving information, and all other aspects of the program need to be thoroughly documented. Businesses also need to clearly define their analytics goals and how to measure results for each project so tools, goals, and staff knowledge are accessible by those who need it. Google Data Studio Jenny Halasz, President and Founder, JLH Marketing Google Data Studio (GDS) is a program designed to make the process of creating compelling views of data easy to setup and use. Key to its success is that GDS plugs into many sources of data, including Google Analytics (GA) and Google Search Console (GSC), to enable the processing of data from those sources simple to setup.  GDS supports far more than GA and GSC, including data from non-Google sources. More companies are creating connectors for GDS all the time. Additional key points about GDS: Corporate governance tracking and tagging make it easier to understand where data is coming from with custom channels and channel rollups. GDS makes it easy for businesses to figure out analytics goals and tie them to business goals. Sharing data and controlling risks can also be easier. It’s recommended that you make a copy of free templates and existing reports so you have copies of original data. A Bigger, Braver, Bolder 2019: What to Stop, Where to Double-Down, How to Kill It Ann Handley, Chief Content Officer, MarketingProfs Email is vastly undervalued. It’s the only place where people, not algorithms, are choosing to receive content. It is a place to build trust and brand affinity by projecting who you are. Email content needs to build trust and affinity. Don’t underinvest in the value of that content. Ninety-two percent of surveyed businesses use email, but how many actively think about the value of the email content? Seventy-three percent of businesses are producing more content than the previous year, but 35% know their content isn’t hitting the mark. Ninety percent met user’s needs, 94% value creativity and craft, and 96% say their audience finds them a credible resource. Businesses need to ask these four questions about content: What are we communicating, and more importantly, how? The content is less important than how the news is conveyed. Personal style increases trust and affinity and should have a human at the other end. Content should be a conversation between the brand or, preferably, a human face for the business. What kind of letters do we most love to get? Include less promotion and more information. Make it more about the subscriber. Write with “here is my reason for writing to you” in mind. Generate a feedback loop to better understand the audience and engage in an intimate and social way. Don’t fret about an audience that isn’t a fit for your content. Focus on your targets. Does your marketing feel like marketing? Don’t tell me what to do, tell me why it matters to me. Ask yourself what your audience wants. How does this content only come from me? Lose the marketing voice and talk to your audience. Businesses need to establish an embedded style that conveys who you are in your content If your logo disappeared from the web, would anyone be able to attribute your website to the brand? Summary Overall, the day was a great success. In our follow-up survey to attendees, on a scale of 1 to 5, the overall conference got a rating of 4.5. We are already starting to plan for Next10x 2020. Interested in receiving updates for next year’s event? Sign me up to stay in the loop about Next10x 2020

3 Image Tools for Marketers on a Budget

Social Media Examiner -

Do you need to create professional-looking images for your social media marketing? Looking for mobile and desktop tools to help? In this article, you’ll discover three affordable image design tools for marketers. #1: Create the Perfectly Sized Image for Every Social Network Over (available for iOS and Android) is a powerful image tool that lets […] The post 3 Image Tools for Marketers on a Budget appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

How to Use Twitter Media Studio to Improve Your Video Marketing

Social Media Examiner -

Want more views for your Twitter videos? Curious how Twitter Media Studio can help optimize your video tweets? In this article, you’ll learn how to use Twitter Media Studio to improve the performance of the videos you publish on Twitter. What Is Twitter Media Studio? With Twitter Media Studio, you can improve the videos you […] The post How to Use Twitter Media Studio to Improve Your Video Marketing appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

How to Research Your Competitors’ Facebook Ads

Social Media Examiner -

Want to know more about your competitors’ Facebook ad campaigns? Wondering how to study their ad strategy? In this article, you’ll discover six ways to research your competitors’ Facebook advertising campaigns and discover creative ideas for your next Facebook ads. #1: Build a Facebook Ad Swipe File A swipe file is a place where you […] The post How to Research Your Competitors’ Facebook Ads appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

Why Your Content Must Be Created by Subject Matter Experts – Here’s Why #214

Stone Temple Consulting Blog -

Consumers want accurate, reliable, easy-to-understand information. Can they trust your content? In this episode of the award-winning Here’s Why digital marketing video series, Eric Enge explains why It matters who creates your brand content.  Publishing Note: Starting with episode #215 scheduled to publish on May 20th, the series will feature Eric Enge and a variety of select industry guests. After episode #215, the publish schedule will be every other week. Don’t miss a single episode of Here’s Why. Click the subscribe button below to be notified via email each time a new video is published. Subscribe to Here’s Why Resources See all of our Here’s Why Videos | Subscribe to our YouTube Channel Transcript Mark: Eric, why do we always say that our content needs to be created by subject matter experts? Eric: That’s a great question, Mark. I think the big key is understanding what the content is being used for. At Perficient, our focus is usually on developing content for content marketing purposes, to build our reputation, increase our rankings in search, and increase our audience. With all those things in mind, you have to realize that the kind of thing we’re trying to do is really thought leadership oriented. You can’t just expect anybody to create that content for you. You need someone who actually knows the topic really well, or else our audience won’t accept it. Mark: You’re saying you should never use just copywriters? Eric: First of all, not exactly. I mean, there are plenty of good roles for copywriters. There’s maybe a lot of content on your site which is really simple, product descriptions or something like that, where you don’t need a true subject matter expert. I think the big key, in that case, is to give them the time to research the topic and be able to write intelligent stuff about whatever they’re addressing. But you can’t expect them to do thought leadership level content in whatever your marketplace is. You can’t just give someone 60 minutes of time, and suddenly, they’re a leading expert on the topic. It really doesn’t work that way, but there are still many ways to leverage the skills of copywriters. Mark: Okay. Can you give an example where SME, subject matter expert level writers are required? Eric: Sure. One is, if you’re trying to build a section in your site, like a content hub with thought leadership level advisory content. These really work best if you answer common user questions and address their needs related to whatever your market space is. This typically requires a pretty high level of expertise to execute really, really well, particularly if you want to create a resource that others might actually link to. So, this might be a wide array of great, helpful articles or a video series, like “Here’s Why”. Hmm, that sounds like a great idea! Or user surveys or other types of research. This level of content really requires a subject matter expert level of, well, expertise. Mark: Okay. How about another example? Eric: If you engage in some level of off-site content marketing–so for example, I publish regularly on Search Engine Land, a column. This provides great visibility for our brand, which is awesome, but Search Engine Land isn’t going to let me publish on their site unless I know something about the topic. So, this is a case where guest posting really makes sense. It’s good for visibility and really getting exposure to your target audience. You’ve got to use this tactic with care, though, because there can be too much of a good thing. So, focus your efforts on publishing in places that have sizable audiences, that are direct interest for your business to be in front of.   Don’t miss a single episode of Here’s Why. Click the subscribe button below to be notified via email each time a new video is published. Subscribe to Here’s Why See all of our Here’s Why Videos | Subscribe to our YouTube Channel

Facebook Marketing Declining: New Research

Social Media Examiner -

Welcome to this week’s edition of the Social Media Marketing Talk Show, a news show for marketers who want to stay on the leading edge of social media. On this week’s Social Media Marketing Talk Show, we explore findings from the 2019 Social Media Marketing Industry Report and Facebook’s new Automated Ads tool with special […] The post Facebook Marketing Declining: New Research appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

How Local Businesses Can Drive More Foot Traffic

Social Media Examiner -

Do you want to drive more foot traffic into your local business? Wondering how social media marketing can help? To explore how local businesses can drive more foot traffic, I interview Stacy Tuschl. Stacy is a local business marketing expert and owner of two performing arts studios. She’s also host of the Foot Traffic podcast […] The post How Local Businesses Can Drive More Foot Traffic appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

3 Ways to Use Facebook Ads to Promote Your Products

Social Media Examiner -

Want to run Facebook ads to promote your products or services? Wondering which type of Facebook ad campaigns to start with? In this article, you’ll discover three types of Facebook advertising campaigns you can use to start promoting your products and services on Facebook. #1: Advertise to People Who Visit Your Website If you’ve already […] The post 3 Ways to Use Facebook Ads to Promote Your Products appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

cPanel®, the Hosting Platform of Choice™, Announces Its Newest Partnership With JetApps, Providing JetBackup to cPanel’s Users

My Host News -

HOUSTON, TX – cPanel is excited to announce a new partnership with JetApps. Starting immediately, users can buy a JetBackup license directly from cPanel. JetBackup supplies hosting providers with a great deal of flexibility by allowing unlimited backup jobs, multiple schedules per job and unlimited destinations. Creating and applying custom hooks to backup and restore functions gives companies the ability to meet the unique needs of their clients. When asked about the importance of quality backups, Eric Ellis, Vice President of Customer Experience for cPanel, LLC said, “Throughout my technical career, I’ve always preached about how vital it is to make and test backups. Understanding how important this is when considering a backup technology partnership, JetBackup stood out as a dependable name in backup software making it an easy choice for cPanel. I’ll be using this robust software on my servers from now on.” JetBackup’s self-service functionality allows cPanel end-users, hosting customers, to restore an account in seconds, removing the support burden with traditional cPanel & WHM backups. Some hosting providers have seen up to 70% fewer support tickets related to account backups and restores. When clients have speed and ease-of-use, it is a win-win for both cPanel partners and their clients. Users can also enable JetBackup’s GDPR compliance feature for their account backups. “We love partnering with companies that share our values of providing a high-quality product, backed by excellent customer service. Naturally, cPanel was a perfect fit! It has been a pleasure working with the entire cPanel team throughout this process of deepening the compatibility and integration of JetBackup into cPanel & WHM®. This partnership is a great benefit to both cPanel and JetBackup customers alike,” Tim Hollis, CEO of JetApps, Inc. JetBackup is now for sale directly through the cPanel store and the Manage2 portal for cPanel partners. It will be available later this year for purchase through the WHM® interface. About cPanel, L.L.C. Established in 1997 by CEO Nick Koston, cPanel provides one of the internet infrastructure industry’s most reliable and intuitive web hosting automation software platforms. With its rich feature set and customer-first support, the fully-automated hosting platform empowers infrastructure providers and gives customers the ability to administer every facet of their website using simple point-and-click software. Based in Houston, Texas, cPanel employs over 220 team members and has customers in more than 70 countries.

AlphaRacks Acquires HostMyBytes, Immediately Adding 23,000 Customers to Its IaaS Platform

My Host News -

Los Angeles, CA – AlphaRacks, a premium infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) provider based out of California currently in a phase of growth-through-acquisition, is today pleased to announce that it has closed on the acquisition of HostMyBytes, a provider of virtual hosting services. This acquisition adds 23,000 customers to AlphaRacks’ platform, now serving over 100,000 customers worldwide. The Los Angeles based IaaS company is actively acquiring cloud computing, virtual hosting, and technology-enabled firms in the industry, most recently also acquiring NFPHosting and WootHosting early 2019, who were previously competitors in the IaaS space. AlphaRacks is actively acquiring other United States-based companies where customers can benefit from the economies of scale and operational efficiencies that AlphaRacks can add to the table, using its years of industry experience and available resources. “This year, as a company, we are in an ideal point which enables us to grow via client acquisition, and the HostMyBytes acquisition is a continued testament to that. AlphaRacks continues to add functional and integrable assets to our hosting portfolio that are in hot-performing markets,” said Julian Jin, managing director with AlphaRacks. “Our new investment serves 23,000 new customers from over 105 different countries and will allow us to expand our global presence even further.” HostMyBytes has been in business for over five years and hosts more than eighty thousand domains on its global network. The company’s goal is to further streamline a personalized hosting solution to meet the rising technology demands of businesses today. AlphaRacks plans to leverage company resources, assets and implement its operational efficiencies to add order in place for HostMyBytes customers, similar to its successful strategy for its prior acquisitions in the IaaS space. “We express eager enjoyment and passion to welcome all HostMyBytes customers onto the AlphaRacks platform.” commented Julian Jin. “We will be adding HostMyBytes customers into the AlphaRacks brand seamlessly, so that customers can immediately take advantage of the additional operational and support benefits we offer by standard. Customers of HostMyBytes will also be pleased to know that we won’t be changing any existing pricing arrangements that were agreed upon with previous management.” commented Julian Jin. He further states, “HostMyBytes has been in business for five years and initially began with humble beginnings. Despite growing pains, we applaud previous HostMyBytes owners for maintaining and building an affordable hosting experience for its multiple dozens of customers from around the globe. We strive on improving upon everything they have built so far, from infrastructure to customer experience – and everything will be done with our customer’s benefit in mind.” About AlphaRacks AlphaRacks is a premium web hosting provider based in Los Angeles, CA. Initially started in 2006 as an on-site IT consultancy firm providing support to local businesses, the AlphaRacks brand was launched in 2013 offering mainstream premium hosting services to both web start-ups and large enterprises. AlphaRacks currently supports over 100,000 clients of all sizes in over 150 countries worldwide. Services include cPanel web hosting, reseller web hosting solutions, hybrid/cloud servers, bare-metal dedicated servers, and virtual private servers, offered in both standardized and custom tailored configurations. Support is provided 24x7x365 by in-house dedicated staff; services are provided by leveraging strategic partnerships of top-tier facility and network providers, ensuring the services AlphaRacks delivers are highly available; which is backed by an industry-leading service level agreement.

Cludhost.com Announces the Addition of G Suite Services to Their Hosting Services Designed to Help Their Clients Grow

My Host News -

WALNUT, CA – Cludhost.com proudly announces the launch of G-Suite Services in addition to their hosting and other digital solutions. Expanding upon the ownership of the email account are several benefits exclusive to using the G Suite paid subscription. G Suite helps businesses stay organized, collaborate, and store their documents in the most secure way. G Suite also helps in creating streamlined communication channels Though popular for its email hosting solutions, G Suite offers much more than that. G Suite includes a variety of intelligent apps and features that can be quite useful. G Suite takes away the headache of having an on-premise server, making it possible for any business, no matter the size to own a complete suite of apps that covers everything, from email to secure file storage. “We are glad to finally add G Suite to our list of services tailored to help businesses grow their online presence. Offering G Suite can help businesses of any size enable business operations without the need for an on-premise server” says, Cludhost.com Co-Founder and Chief Operating Officer, Moiz Khan. Benefits of using G Suite from CludHost.com include: Cost Saving. (G Suite offers a set of familiar apps such as Gmail, Docs, Drive and Calendar). G Suite aids efficient team collaboration. (Team members can organize and share files together using G Suite apps). Data Security. Streamlined Communication. Easier Organization. CludHost.com’s G Suite service is a great solution for businesses who intend to create a formidable digital powerhouse for their in-house communication team, carry out effective email communication with their customers and store files safely. About CludHost.com CludHost.com is a fast growing provider of web hosting and related services. CludHost offers Shared, Reseller, VPS and Dedicated web hosting services. Owing to unwavering commitment to help their customers grow, CludHost now offers G Suite Services.

Nexcess Hosts Opening Night Party At Magento Imagine In Las Vegas

My Host News -

SOUTHFIELD, MI – Nexcess, a leading provider of Magento cloud hosting, will kick off Magento Imagine 2019 in Las Vegas with a special evening party at TopGolf. Magento Imagine brings together retailers, ecommerce service providers, agencies, and developers from across the world on May 13–15 at the Wynn Las Vegas. NexcessLive at Topgolf will take place from 7:30-10:30 p.m. on Monday, May 12, the first day of Magento Imagine. Topgolf is a renowned indoor golf and event space in Las Vegas. “Magento Imagine is one of the highlights of the year for us, and we’re thrilled to be hosting a party for professionals from across the Magento world,“ commented Chris Wells, President and CEO of Nexcess. “We look forward to meeting retailers to talk about how Magento hosting has evolved in the last year, including the new Nexcess Cloud for Magento.” The party is a don’t-miss opportunity to relax, have fun, and get to know Magento professionals in an informal environment. NexcessLive is free to attend, and Nexcess will provide everything partygoers need to have a good time, including food, drinks, prizes, and party buses to take attendees to and from Topgolf in style. The venue has limited space, so conference attendees should reserve a ticket as soon as possible to avoid missing out. Attendees are encouraged to engage with their Nexcess hosts to learn more about cloud hosting, performance optimization, and how Nexcess’s Magento hosting platform can improve the reliability, stability, and performance of their ecommerce store. Magento Imagine is the premier conference for the Magento ecommerce world, attracting over 3,000 attendees from 60 countries. Over 150 speakers will attend; more than 100 sessions will cover a full spectrum of Magento and ecommerce-related topics. This year’s keynote speaker is entrepreneur Gary Vaynerchuk, CEO of VaynerMedia and author of several best-selling books. Among the many other speakers are senior executives from Magento, Adobe, HP Inc., and PayPal. About Nexcess Nexcess is a Southfield, Michigan-based managed cloud and application hosting company founded in 2000, with data centers distributed throughout the United States, Europe, and Australia. Nexcess offers a variety of performance-optimized and scalable managed cloud and bare metal hosting solutions for Magento, WordPress, WooCommerce, Drupal, ExpressionEngine, Craft CMS, and OroCRM. For more information, visit http://www.nexcess.net.

DataBank Commences Construction for Salt Lake City 5 Data Center

My Host News -

Dallas, TX – DataBank, a leading provider of enterprise-class data center, connectivity, managed services and cloud solutions, announces the commencement of construction for its Salt Lake City 5 (SLC5) data center. Located on DataBank’s 24-acre Granite Point Campus in Bluffdale, UT, Salt Lake City 5 offers enterprises and hyperscalers significant power and space for rapid deployment and expansion. SLC5 has a ready-for-service date of Q4 2019. The DataBank Granite Point Campus includes SLC2, SLC3, and SLC4 data centers as well as DataBank’s privately-owned 66-megawatt substation, offering significant power capabilities and reliability for the entire campus. Nicknamed “Silicon Slopes”, Utah has seen tremendous business growth in the technology sector with tech jobs growing at a rate of 3.6% (nearly double the national average). Those jobs are in areas such as IT support, information, computer and software sales and manufacturing. As a fully integrated and highly connected state-of-the-art facility, SLC5 was designed with the flexibility to address this growth across a wide range of customer requirements. The facility will connect to SLC 1, the de facto carrier SLC interconnection point via a high-speed optical metro transport ring. SLC5 will also encompass DataBank’s full services suite including colocation, compliant hosting, managed services, cloud computing, and storage. “Today’s high–performance computing, content providers, cloud giants and large enterprises need the ability to rapidly scale across all fronts – capacity, power, cooling, and connectivity,” comments Kevin Ooley, President & CFO for DataBank. “DataBank designed the Granite Point campus with our customers’ power and expansion requirements in mind, which were also the underlying reasons we designed and operate our own N+1 power substation. SLC5 offers customers redundancy at every level along with the ability to securely and reliably deliver applications and content.” SLC5 was designed to: Support 10MW of redundant critical load capacity Include 12 or more carriers and cloud service providers Enable rapid customer deployments Flexibly accommodate 175-250+ watts per sq. ft. Meet high performance computing requirements Offer full customer amenities including break areas, private offices, training room, burn in room, and secure storage Built with multiple layers of security access, SLC5 will have five 10,000 sq. ft. data halls with 36 inch raised floors and a total gross size of 90,000 sq. ft. Designed to support mission-critical workloads, SLC5 will be built to the standards necessary to achieve a high-security environment such as HIPAA, PCI-DSS, SSAE-18 SOC1 and SOC2, GDPR, and FedRAMP. About DataBank DataBank is a leading provider of enterprise-class data center, cloud, and connectivity services, offering customers 100% uptime availability of data, applications, and infrastructure. DataBank’s managed data center services are anchored in world-class facilities. Our customized technology solutions are designed to help customers effectively manage risk, improve their technology performance, and allow them to focus on their core business objectives. DataBank is headquartered in the historic former Federal Reserve Bank Building, in downtown Dallas, TX.

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