Industry Buzz

Facebook Testing Influencer Marketing Search Engine

Social Media Examiner -

Welcome to this week’s edition of the Social Media Marketing Talk Show, a news show for marketers who want to stay on the leading edge of social media. On this week’s Social Media Marketing Talk Show, we explore Facebook testing a search engine for influencer marketing, Instagram’s new Mute option, and other breaking social media [...] The post Facebook Testing Influencer Marketing Search Engine appeared first on .

WP Engine Awarded For Company Culture At A-List Awards

WP Engine -

Last night, WP Engine, among 20 other Austin-based startups, were honored during the eighth-annual A-List awards. During the event held at ACL in the downtown-based Moody Theater, startups were awarded according to four categories: Emerging, Growth, Scale and Culture. Recognized emerging startups have received $5M or less in funding, companies in the Growth category have… The post WP Engine Awarded For Company Culture At A-List Awards appeared first on WP Engine.

The WordPress Community: A World of Sharing and Support

Justhost Blog -

This week, WordPress celebrates it’s 15th anniversary with celebrations all over the world. With over 22 million downloads of its latest version alone, WordPress is the world’s most popular website builder and content management system. But, WordPress is also much more than that. Behind the free, open source WordPress download is a vibrant community of designers, developers, and WordPress lovers of all kinds who work together to keep WordPress itself running smoothly and to provide education, connection, and innovation through real-world conferences, meetups, and trainings. WordPress began life as a resource aimed primarily at bloggers – and blogging is still supported in most WordPress themes. But the platform’s relative simplicity and ease of use has rapidly made it the site building software of choice for many other purposes as well – so much so that now, WordPress has been translated into over 50 languages and consists of nearly 350,000 lines of code. It can be used by a new blogger with no experience in coding or site design or as the basis for sophisticated customization by professional web developers. A Community of Dedicated Users What makes all this possible is the fact that WordPress is free to download and “owned” by its users – a piece of open source software under General Public License that can always be updated and changed through contributions by its vast and growing user community. From new users to seasoned professionals, the members of that community are committed to keeping WordPress freely available and making sure its source code remains stable and functional, no matter who happens to be involved with its development in the future. To support those goals, Matt Mullenweg, the developer who created WordPress, has established the WordPress Foundation, an organization dedicated to supporting the ongoing development of WordPress and to sharing WordPress with the world. Today, the WordPress Foundation is the nexus of WordPress related projects ranging from actual work on WordPress itself to local events and outreach efforts to bring computing to underserved areas of the world. The WordPress community is a large and devoted one, dedicated both to making WordPress the best it can be and supporting connection among its many members worldwide. Because WordPress is – and, its users maintain, will always be – free to use and always editable, the platform invites interaction and attracts a large and diverse band of supporters and aficionados who support WordPress and each other in a variety of ways. WordPress Teams – Contributor Support WordPress depends on the work of its large community of developers and designers to keep WordPress running and make any needed upgrades and fixes in the program. This team is known as the Contributor Team. To provide a framework for the volunteers who devote their time to building and improving WordPress, the WordPress home site provides a directory of the many teams that work directly on the interface itself, as well as on related support functions. WordPress-centered teams include the Core team, which is responsible for writing essential WordPress code, fixing bugs, and maintaining the core structure of WordPress; the Design team, which works on developing new aspects of the interface; and the Theme team, which reviews and approves all new themes for inclusion in the massive WordPress theme repository. On the outreach side, teams work on documentation, training, WordPress marketing, and support. There are even teams for running WordPress TV, the home of many WordPress tutorials, WordCamp talks, help videos, developing plugins, and translating WordPress and its related documentation into different languages. Teams connect in weekly virtual meetings hosted by the workplace management app Slack. Anyone with the relevant skills can apply to become part of a WordPress team and, with teams ranging from high-level coding and site development to general user support, there are opportunities for volunteers of all levels to get involved with WordPress. Did you know that many WordCamps have an additional camp day just for contributors to connect and work on projects? WordCamps – Real World WordPress Conferences Founder Matt Mullenweg organized the first WordCamp in San Francisco in 2005. Since then, more than 800 of these low-cost, user-friendly conferences dedicated to all things WordPress have been held in 69 cities around the world, spanning 6 continents, with many more on the schedule for the next year and beyond. WordCamps are organized by local WordPress users in cities small and large around the world. While content can vary, all WordCamps are focused entirely on WordPress, with presentations, workshops, panels, and demos devoted to topics such as new features, troubleshooting site issues, and making the most of WordPress tools. WordCamps provide a place for new users to mingle with WordPress experts, and for users of all skill levels and interests to meet and make connections. Find a WordCamp near you. Meetups – Connecting Users in Real Life In many communities, WordPress users are forming their own groups to share ideas and learn more about WordPress. Meetup.com —an online tool that helps people organize and run groups and communities around a shared interest, makes it possible for WordPress aficionados to find and join a WordPress meetup in their area. To encourage users to form Meetup groups, the WordPress Foundation has a Meetup account to cover the costs of organizers’ dues. The Foundation also supports the development of trainings and educational materials for use in WordPress groups and outreach to the community. Anyone with an interest in WordPress can join a group, either through Meetup or through local organizers, to learn about WordPress and meet others with shared interests. WordPress Forums – Virtual Connections for WordPress Users The WordPress community also exists online. WordPress.org, the platform’s home site, features forums on all kinds of WordPress related topics ranging from design and development issues to troubleshooting problems with WordPress installation and performance. Multiple threads allow users to connect and support each other with advice, solutions, and shared interest. New topics can be created at any time, and any user can participate with a sign-in to the site. WordPress powers over a quarter of the world’s websites with tools that can be used both by new site owners and experienced developers. It’s available to anyone, virtually anywhere, and it can be maintained and updated at any time by its users. Making connections both online and off, those users form a worldwide community of WordPress supporters dedicated to keeping WordPress free, accessible, and secure. How do you support and connect with the WordPress community? The post The WordPress Community: A World of Sharing and Support appeared first on Official Bluehost Blog.

The WordPress Community: A World of Sharing and Support

Bluehost Blog -

This week, WordPress celebrates it’s 15th anniversary with celebrations all over the world. With over 22 million downloads of its latest version alone, WordPress is the world’s most popular website builder and content management system. But, WordPress is also much more than that. Behind the free, open source WordPress download is a vibrant community of designers, developers, and WordPress lovers of all kinds who work together to keep WordPress itself running smoothly and to provide education, connection, and innovation through real-world conferences, meetups, and trainings. WordPress began life as a resource aimed primarily at bloggers – and blogging is still supported in most WordPress themes. But the platform’s relative simplicity and ease of use has rapidly made it the site building software of choice for many other purposes as well – so much so that now, WordPress has been translated into over 50 languages and consists of nearly 350,000 lines of code. It can be used by a new blogger with no experience in coding or site design or as the basis for sophisticated customization by professional web developers. A Community of Dedicated Users What makes all this possible is the fact that WordPress is free to download and “owned” by its users – a piece of open source software under General Public License that can always be updated and changed through contributions by its vast and growing user community. From new users to seasoned professionals, the members of that community are committed to keeping WordPress freely available and making sure its source code remains stable and functional, no matter who happens to be involved with its development in the future. To support those goals, Matt Mullenweg, the developer who created WordPress, has established the WordPress Foundation, an organization dedicated to supporting the ongoing development of WordPress and to sharing WordPress with the world. Today, the WordPress Foundation is the nexus of WordPress related projects ranging from actual work on WordPress itself to local events and outreach efforts to bring computing to underserved areas of the world. The WordPress community is a large and devoted one, dedicated both to making WordPress the best it can be and supporting connection among its many members worldwide. Because WordPress is – and, its users maintain, will always be – free to use and always editable, the platform invites interaction and attracts a large and diverse band of supporters and aficionados who support WordPress and each other in a variety of ways. WordPress Teams – Contributor Support WordPress depends on the work of its large community of developers and designers to keep WordPress running and make any needed upgrades and fixes in the program. This team is known as the Contributor Team. To provide a framework for the volunteers who devote their time to building and improving WordPress, the WordPress home site provides a directory of the many teams that work directly on the interface itself, as well as on related support functions. WordPress-centered teams include the Core team, which is responsible for writing essential WordPress code, fixing bugs, and maintaining the core structure of WordPress; the Design team, which works on developing new aspects of the interface; and the Theme team, which reviews and approves all new themes for inclusion in the massive WordPress theme repository. On the outreach side, teams work on documentation, training, WordPress marketing, and support. There are even teams for running WordPress TV, the home of many WordPress tutorials, WordCamp talks, help videos, developing plugins, and translating WordPress and its related documentation into different languages. Teams connect in weekly virtual meetings hosted by the workplace management app Slack. Anyone with the relevant skills can apply to become part of a WordPress team and, with teams ranging from high-level coding and site development to general user support, there are opportunities for volunteers of all levels to get involved with WordPress. Did you know that many WordCamps have an additional camp day just for contributors to connect and work on projects? WordCamps – Real World WordPress Conferences Founder Matt Mullenweg organized the first WordCamp in San Francisco in 2005. Since then, more than 800 of these low-cost, user-friendly conferences dedicated to all things WordPress have been held in 69 cities around the world, spanning 6 continents, with many more on the schedule for the next year and beyond. WordCamps are organized by local WordPress users in cities small and large around the world. While content can vary, all WordCamps are focused entirely on WordPress, with presentations, workshops, panels, and demos devoted to topics such as new features, troubleshooting site issues, and making the most of WordPress tools. WordCamps provide a place for new users to mingle with WordPress experts, and for users of all skill levels and interests to meet and make connections. Find a WordCamp near you. Meetups – Connecting Users in Real Life In many communities, WordPress users are forming their own groups to share ideas and learn more about WordPress. Meetup.com —an online tool that helps people organize and run groups and communities around a shared interest, makes it possible for WordPress aficionados to find and join a WordPress meetup in their area. To encourage users to form Meetup groups, the WordPress Foundation has a Meetup account to cover the costs of organizers’ dues. The Foundation also supports the development of trainings and educational materials for use in WordPress groups and outreach to the community. Anyone with an interest in WordPress can join a group, either through Meetup or through local organizers, to learn about WordPress and meet others with shared interests. WordPress Forums – Virtual Connections for WordPress Users The WordPress community also exists online. WordPress.org, the platform’s home site, features forums on all kinds of WordPress related topics ranging from design and development issues to troubleshooting problems with WordPress installation and performance. Multiple threads allow users to connect and support each other with advice, solutions, and shared interest. New topics can be created at any time, and any user can participate with a sign-in to the site. WordPress powers over a quarter of the world’s websites with tools that can be used both by new site owners and experienced developers. It’s available to anyone, virtually anywhere, and it can be maintained and updated at any time by its users. Making connections both online and off, those users form a worldwide community of WordPress supporters dedicated to keeping WordPress free, accessible, and secure. How do you support and connect with the WordPress community? The post The WordPress Community: A World of Sharing and Support appeared first on Official Bluehost Blog.

How to pick the right domain for your custom link shortener

Name.com Blog -

By Louisa McGrath URL shorteners have been around for years turning long URLs into shorter, more manageable links. Today, businesses are pulling ahead by using custom link shorteners which reduce long links into a digestible and memorable format. Custom short links boost brand visibility, awareness and the CTR of your marketing messages. They are usually made up […] The post How to pick the right domain for your custom link shortener appeared first on Name.com Blog.

Happy 15th Birthday WordPress!

WP Engine -

This Sunday, May 27, will mark 15 years since the first release of WordPress. That’s right, it’s been 15 years since a 19-year-old freshman at the University of Houston launched the initial version of what would become the Web’s most popular Content Management System (CMS). Late May 2003 was undoubtedly a simpler time. 50 Cent… The post Happy 15th Birthday WordPress! appeared first on WP Engine.

Choosing Hyper-V Replica vs. Azure Site Recovery

The Rackspace Blog & Newsroom -

For IT professionals, unplanned service disruptions and data center outages are a fact of life. But luckily for those who rely on Microsoft technologies, Microsoft offers two excellent replication options to support disaster recovery and business continuity strategies. The first, Hyper-V Replica, creates and maintains copies of virtual machines (VMs) in a secondary site. It’s […] The post Choosing Hyper-V Replica vs. Azure Site Recovery appeared first on The Official Rackspace Blog.

Alexa Flash Briefings: What Marketers Need to Know

Social Media Examiner -

Want to reach people regularly via their smart speakers? Wondering how Alexa flash briefings work? To explore how marketers can benefit from Alexa flash briefings, I interview Chris Brogan. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It’s designed to help busy marketers, business [...] The post Alexa Flash Briefings: What Marketers Need to Know appeared first on .

WordPress.org Privacy Policy Updates

WordPress.org News -

The WordPress.org privacy policy has been updated, hurray! While we weren’t able to remove all the long sentences, we hope you find the revisions make it easier to understand: how we collect and use data, how long the data we collect is retained, and how you can request a copy of the data you’ve shared with us. There hasn’t been any change to the data that WordPress.org collects or how that data is used; the privacy policy just provides more detail now. Happy reading, and thanks for using WordPress!  

We are moving, get on the bus!

Hosting Nation Blog -

This is a copy of the email we’ve sent out to all our domain name customers. Email Subject: Urgent News from Hosting Nation. We are moving your domains! You are receiving this email because you have a domain registered with Hosting Nation and your email address is the Registrant email contact. What is happening? Due to a recent major price increase at our domain provider Enom, and rather poor service we’ve received, we are moving to a new domain provider. We have had an enterprise level Enom account since 2006, and now are moving all our domains to our new provider – Hexonet. Your domain will still be managed by Hosting Nation entirely. Our upstream provider of domains is what is changing. You will continue to login and pay Hosting Nation for domains.   How is this going to happen? To achieve this, we need your cooperation. Since all the domains we manage (your domains) have to be officially ‘moved’ from our Enom account to our Hexonet account, we need your EPP Key for each domain name registered with us. When your domain renewal comes due, and you pay for the renewal, the domain will physically move from our old Enom account to our new Hexonet account. But in order for that to happen, we 1st need the EPP Key for each domain to be renewed. We cannot ‘see’ your EPP Key, but we can send it to your email address on the Registrant contact for the domain name.   What do I need to do? We are going to send out your EPP Key to you for each domain name you have registered with us. All you need to do is forward that email back to us at epp@hosting-nation.com That’s it! Not so hard eh? We have also attached a screenshot of what the email will look like when you receive your EPP Key (see below or attachment in email).   The result! The next time your domain renews with us, it will actually renew & transfer from our old account to our new one. We thought this would   Got Questions? What if I don’t send you the EPP Key? You will then stay on our Enom account where you are now, and as of May 30th this month the prices will increase significantly to help us cover the Enom price increase we will incur. Don’t say we didn’t warn you! What if I don’t want to renew my domain? No worries, simply don’t send the EPP Key back to us. You are choosing to not renew anyway, so just let it expire where it is. How do I know this is not some phishing or fraud scheme? To verify the authenticity of this notice, you can check the links below on our own websites where we’ve posted this same notice. If that isn’t enough, call us or put in a ticket to support@hostingnation.ca Hosting Nation support – https://help.hosting-nation.com Hosting Nation blog – https://hosting-nation.com/blog/ Hosting Nation USA  https://www.hosting-nation.com Hosting Nation CAD  https://hosting-nation.ca HostingWithUs  https://hostingwithus.com   Hosting Nation Data Inc. Local: 250.586.4678 | Toll Free: 888.558.4678 Hosting Nation Support: support@hostingnation.ca | Online Help Desk PO Box 613, Parksville, B.C. Canada V9P 2G7 www.hostingnation.ca    www.hosting-nation.com   www.hostingwithus.com

The Only eCommerce KPI Metrics Glossary You’ll Ever Need

Liquid Web Official Blog -

If you hear people talking about KPI metrics, or more explicitly eCommerce KPI metrics, and didn’t want to be the one that raised your hand to ask what they were talking about, we have you covered.   Let’s begin with a couple of definitions to make sure we’re on the same page as we walk our way through a glossary of your store’s eCommerce KPI metrics.   Common Definitions to Know   eCommerce is defined as commerce conducted via the internet. This can be business to business, business to consumer, consumer to business, or consumer to consumer.   Key Performance Indicator (KPI): is a quantifiable measure of success/failure against a goal.   A Metric is defined as a system or standard of measure.   And keep in mind, you set your business goals. These KPI metrics help you measure performance against your chosen goals. Definitions of KPI Metrics   1. Average Page Load Time – (6.06s) The average amount of time, in seconds, it takes for your complete page to load in your website visitor’s browser.  This is important to your store because reducing the average page load time by 1.6 seconds would increase annual revenue growth by 10 percent.   2. Average Server Response Time – (1.04s) The average amount of time, in seconds, it takes for your server to respond. Can be overlooked in favor of optimizing the page. However, if the server response is slow, a well optimized page will still load slow. Google recommends a server response of under 200ms.   3. Pages per Session – (5) The average number of pages visited per session for each specific website visitor. This metric is significant because if visitors are leaving your website before visiting other pages, that works against your conversion goals. On the other end of the spectrum, if visitors are viewing loads of pages but not converting, that may mean your messaging is not clear enough for visitors to trust and buy.   4. Session Duration – (3m 24s) The average amount of time each website visitor session lasts. The longer your visitors spend on your website, and in your store, the better. Unless we’re talking about your checkout pages, where too much time being spent works against conversion.   5. Bounce Rate – (38 percent) The percentage of your website visitors who left without visiting a second page on your site. It’s significant, because if too many people are leaving your website without visiting additional pages, that will work against your store goals.   6. Mobile Page Views The number of pages viewed using mobile devices. A higher percentage of mobile pageviews correlates with higher revenue growth per Wolfgang Digitals 2017 KPI Report.   7. Tablet Page Views The number of pages viewed using tablets. Higher than average Tablet Pageviews also correlates with revenue growth per Wolfgang. But keep it in perspective, since the same report states that desktop users were 164 percent more likely to convert than mobile, while desktop visitors accounted for 61 percent of all online revenue.   8. Pinterest Traffic The total amount of visitors from Pinterest for a chosen period of time. This is significant, because Wolfgang did not classify Pinterest as a social network; rather, it was classified as an “intent-driven research engine.” Wolfgang found that a higher proportion of Pinterest traffic correlated with a higher Average Order Value for their stores.   9. Instagram Traffic The total amount of visitors from Instagram for a chosen period of time. This is significant because even though Instagram’s only clickable links are the single profile links, Instagram still had higher order values than Twitter, Pinterest, and Facebook.   10. Website Traffic The total traffic to your website for a given period of time. Significant toward calculating other KPIs, as well as for tracking your website’s traffic trend over time.   11. Traffic Source Below is a Google Analytics report answering the following question: “Which channel did a website visitor find your store through?” Google Organic Traffic – (32 percent) Organic traffic from Google merely means someone found you by searching and clicking your link in the search results. On average, this is where most of the traffic comes from. Google CPC Traffic – (23 percent) Total traffic to your website from paid (cost-per-click) Google advertisements. This is significant because Google CPC generates 25 percent of all revenue. Direct Traffic – (21 percent) Where they came directly to your website, includes loyal and repeat customers. In Google Analytics, this also includes what is called “dark traffic.” Traffic From Email – (1 percent) Total website visitors from links in emails. Important because stores who get more traffic from email average a higher average order value. And email still drives three times as much revenue as Facebook. Facebook Organic Traffic – (2 percent) Facebook organic traffic accounts for visitors to your website that did not come from your paid advertisement via Facebook ads. Significant in evaluating your social marketing strategy efforts through your store’s Facebook page. Facebook CPC Traffic – (2 percent) This is the traffic coming from your Facebook ad spend. The significance to your efforts will depend on the goal you set for your Facebook ad spend, but these visitors and seeing where they go after the landing page is also helpful. Bing Organic Traffic – (1 percent) Organic traffic from Bing means someone found you by searching and clicking your link in the Bing search results. It’s significant if you can associate it with other metrics, specifically average order value and/or higher lifetime value. Yahoo Organic Traffic Organic traffic from Yahoo means someone finds you by searching and clicking your link in the Yahoo search results. It’s also significant if you can associate it with other metrics, specifically average order value and higher lifetime value.   12. Email Opt-In Conversion Rate Total number of email subscribers for a period of time divided by the total site visitors for the same period of time and then multiplied by 100 for the percentage. Significant in evaluating your email opt in messaging. Is it working to take strangers that visit your website and convert them into email subscribers?   13. Shopping Cart Sessions Total number of website visitors who began a cart session, by adding an item to your shopping cart. The total number of shopping cart sessions helps determine the shopping cart abandon rate. Also important as a trend over time with the question being, are there more or are there less cart sessions initiated month-to-month?   14. Shopping Cart Abandons Total number of website visitors who began a cart session but did not move on from the shopping cart to the checkout page.  The average is right at seventy-percent of shopping cart sessions end in abandonment. Establishing the total number of abandoned carts allows you to track how many carts you’re able to reclaim via your cart abandonment efforts.   15. Shopping Cart Conversion Rate The percentage of website visitors who began a shopping cart session and completed the checkout process. How many shopping cart sessions converted is extremely significant as a store owner. A low rate means you need to remove friction from your shopping cart conversion process.   16. Shopping Cart Abandonment Rate – (69.23 percent) The percentage of shopping cart sessions that do not complete checkout. Found by taking the total number of completed purchases for the time period and dividing it by the total number of shopping cart sessions for the same period and then multiplying the number by 100 for the percentage. Managing this number is a quick path to more revenue each month.   17. Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC) Helps you see how much it costs your store to acquire a new customer. Find your CAC by dividing your marketing spend by your total number of customers. It’s helpful at a macro level to manage your return on investment from your marketing spend.   18. Gross Profit Margin – (in the 30-40 percent range) Is expressed as a percentage of your revenue that turns into profit. It being gross profit margin, it only subtracts your cost of goods sold from your total revenue and you then multiply that number by 100 for the percentage. Significant in managing your store’s profit margin.   19. Net Profit Margin Start with total revenue, aka all the sales, fees, and other monies collected by your store and then subtract out the cost of goods sold, taxes, operating expenses, and interest paid and then multiply that amount by 100 to find your net profit margin. Significant in managing your store’s profit margin.   20. Percent Returning Customers The percentage of returning customers is found by taking the number of returning customers (those buying for the second time or more), and then dividing it by the total customers. Take the product and multiply it by 100 to express it in a percentage. Selling more to current customers is cheaper than paying to acquire a brand new customer, right?   21. Revenue Growth Is found by taking the current period’s revenue and subtracting the prior period’s revenue. Divide that number by the prior period’s revenue and then multiply by 100 for the percentage. At a macro level, this is significant to know which way your revenue total is moving. Up or down? And at what rate?   22. Revenue by Traffic Source The total revenue for a specific source of website traffic over a chosen period of time. Helpful to determine your most profitable traffic sources as you allocate your marketing budget moving forward.   23. Revenue on Ad Spend Total amount of revenue attributed to a specific ad spend/campaign. Significant as part of determining your return on investment from your ad spend.   24. Number of Transactions The total number of transactions for a given period of time. This is helpful in determining other metrics, and is typically important to store owners that this number consistently trend in a positive direction.   25. Cost per Conversion How much does it cost for each of your store’s conversions? Found by taking the total cost for the traffic and dividing it by the number of conversions. This is significant in helping you determine if your advertising spend is driving conversions to your product.   26. Cost per Click – (Adwords average is ~$2) The total cost for each click of an advertisement, each of which delivers a website visitor. Significant because it’s one way to measure the return on investment into your store’s paid advertisements.   27. Customer Lifetime Value (LTV) Calculating a customer’s lifetime value seeks to forecast the total revenue each customer will generate over the course of their customer lifespan with your store. The “simple” version of the calculation involves multiplying the annual revenue per customer by the customer relationship in years, then subtracting the customer cost of acquisition.15  (Find much more here. And here.)   28. Average Customer Lifespan The number of days the average customer remains a customer of your store. Your business isn’t a short term proposition, so the longer the average customer lifespan, the better for your store.   29. Customer Retention Rate The percentage of customers from a specific time period that return and purchase as compared to an earlier, equal time period. Significant because a high percentage of returning customers is an indicator of successful stores.   30. The Rate of Discount Defines the interest rate used in discounted cash flow analysis to determine the present value of future cash flows.14  Significant in the more complicated formulas for customer lifetime value.   31. Gross Margin Found by taking your store’s total sales revenue and subtracting the cost of goods sold. Then divide the product by revenue and multiply by 100 to get gross margin (expressed as a percentage). Significant in managing your store’s profitability, as the higher the percentage of gross margin, the more revenue that becomes profit for your store.   32. Average Gross Margin per Customer Lifespan Found by finding the percentage of profit margin per customer from the total revenue per customer lifetime.  Plays a role in complicated customer lifetime value formulas.   33. Average Order Value – ($217.82) The average value of your store’s orders is found by taking the total store sales and dividing it by the number of transactions. Significant to most store owners but keep in mind that the higher the average order value the lower your conversion rates, because pricey purchases take more clicks.   34. eCommerce Conversion Rate – (1.56 percent) The total number of store transactions and divide it by the total visitors to your online store and then multiply that number by 100 for the percentage. This is significant because it shows on a macro level how successful your store is at turning visitors into customers.   35. Visits to Purchase The average number of store visits required for a customer to purchase. If it takes too many visits for people to purchase, you will want to look for ways to remove friction from your checkout process. And be sure you have social proof as well as trust items throughout your checkout process.   36. New Customer on First Visit The percentage of visitors who purchase on their first visit. Most shoppers will not buy on their first visit, so if you have an inordinate amount of first time customers, that is a good thing.   37. Unique Online Buyers The total number of unique online buyers that visited your store over a given period of time. Helpful to drill down to the total unique buyers amid all your return buyers.   38. Average Cost per Order Gives the average advertising cost per order. Find it by dividing the total investment into marketing by the store’s total number of orders. Helpful in evaluating your advertising dollars against the number of online orders your advertising is driving in your store.   39. Conversion by Traffic Source Total number of conversions specific to a traffic source. Tracking conversions back through the traffic source they originated is always helpful for allocating future marketing budget for your store.   40. Conversion by Device Type Total number of conversions specific to a device type. Knowing which device your shoppers use to convert is helpful for your marketing budget as well. For store owners, keep in mind that desktops still generate 61 of revenue versus smartphones and tablets.   41. Shipping Error Rate Track the number of shipping errors. Found by dividing the total number of erroneously shipped orders by the total number of orders shipped. Significant because it helps you manage your shipping success rate, which influences customer happiness.   42. Product Views per Session The average number of products a potential customer views during their session with your store. Too many product views per session can portend of confusing copy on your products page. Or lack of clarity on the specifics of how the shipping process plays out for your store.   43. Average Shopping Session Length Measure the average amount of time a single person spends on your site that concludes with a checkout. If your average shopping sessions are too long that’s a reason to remove friction from your checkout process.   44. NPS – Net Promoter Score Measures how likely someone is to recommend your store. Found by asking customers to rate their likeliness to recommend your store on a scale of one to ten. Significant because it helps you monitor how happy your customers are with your store. And anytime you’re talking about customer intent to share your store with others, you want to keep a close eye on.   45. Average Email Open Rate – (16.75 percent) Percentage of emails sent that are opened. Significant because people have to open your emails to buy from you. And if your emails are not being opened, consider running some A/B tests on your email subject lines in order to learn which subject lines your audience opens more often.   46. Email Click Through Rate – (2.32 percent) Percentage of emails where a link was clicked. The whole point of an email sent from your store is to have it opened and then to have them click on a link within the email. Making click through rate important for anyone doing digital marketing.   47. Refund Rate As an eCommerce store owner, you’re going to have some refunds. But if your refund rate is too high, there’s a problem with customer expectations on product pages and in your checkout process.   48. High Traffic Periods You want to be aware of the period of time that your high traffic lasts. It’s different for every store. For instance, you may send an email to your email list each morning after which you have an hour of very high traffic. Much like staffing for a retail store, knowing your high traffic periods and verifying them via analytics each quarter for changes, helps you make sure your customers are cared for in the manner you expect.   49. Average Page Weight Check the page weight of your most visited pages. Track the average page weight in the interest of better page load times for your store’s pages. Run the individual urls through GTMetrix.com and it will tell you how fast each page loaded as well as the weight of each page in kilobytes.   50. Daily Traffic – Total Visitors/Day Keeping a handle on your store’s day-to-day foot traffic, helps you plan resources for concurrency of customer orders. For online stores, think of your hosting resources along the same lines of staffing your brick-and-mortar location.   51. Subscriber Growth Rate Designed to determine how many new subscribers you’re attracting through the various ways people can connect with your brand. It’s significant to see how your message is resonating with your audience. Find this ratio by adding together the number of leads, registrations, and signups. Then multiply that total by your conversion rate for the same period of time to get your subscriber growth rate.   52. Value Per Visit Find the value per visit metric by taking the total store revenue for a period of time and dividing it by the total visitors for the same period of time.  This is helpful to provide context when planning your marketing activities. Want to read more about eCommerce KPI metrics?   Here are some resources to digest more resources on eCommerce KPIs.   Wolfgang Digital’s 2017 eCommerce KPI benchmarks study https://moz.com/blog/ecommerce-benchmark-kpi-study-2017 Adstage post from 11-6-17 Klipfolio eCommerce KPI Metrics Referralcandy eCommerce metrics Shopify eCommerce https://baymard.com/lists/cart-abandonment-rate https://www.affirm.com/content/most-important-ecommerce-metrics-kpis/ https://www.geckoboard.com/learn/kpi-examples/ecommerce-kpis/ https://blog.apruve.com/top-7-ecommerce-metrics-and-kpis-you-need-to-be-tracking https://www.metrilo.com/blog/important-ecommerce-metrics https://www.monsterinsights.com/crucial-ecommerce-kpis-to-track-in-google-analytics/ https://blog.vendhq.com/post/64901830602/retail-metrics-and-kpis https://blog.kissmetrics.com/how-to-calculate-lifetime-value/?wide=1 https://www.propellercrm.com/blog/customer-lifetime-value-clv http://www.dummies.com/social-media/blogging/google-analytics-traffic-sources-report/ https://www.storegrowers.com/ecommerce-kpi-benchmarks/ https://www.shopify.com/enterprise/ecommerce-analytics Conclusion   Here’s the good news – you don’t have to keep an eye on all of these KPI metrics all the time.   Set your store goal, then choose the KPI metrics that help you measure your store’s performance against the goal. For those key performance indicators, setup a daily or weekly reporting so that you can regularly check in on how things are going.   What’s really exciting is that if you’re using our Managed WooCommerce Hosting product from Liquid Web, you’ll have access to tons of data and KPI metrics via our partnership with Glew.io.   The post The Only eCommerce KPI Metrics Glossary You’ll Ever Need appeared first on Liquid Web.

DATA PROTECTION POLICY NOW ONLINE – HOW THIS AFFECTS YOU

Certified Web Hosting Blog -

By Matt Collins, General Counsel The European Union has instituted a new law that affects companies with that collect personal information from Europe visitors. This new law is called the General Data Protection Regulation or “GDPR”. The purpose of this article is to introduce you to the GDPR, explain Certified Hosting’s new policy and highlight what you should know for your own business. INTRODUCTION TO THE GDPR The GDPR applies to any company that collects personal information from an EU citizen and thus this law applies to companies throughout the world…and may apply to you as well. The GDPR takes effect on May 25, 2018 and that is the date that the Certified Hosting policy also takes effect. The goal of the GDPR is to give European citizens control of their personal data. The definition of personal data is set out in the Certified Hosting Data Protection Policy in Section 3. In short, personal data is any information relating to a person who can be identified directly or indirectly, by reference to an identifier such as a name, an identification number, location data, online identifier or to one or more factors specific to the physical, physiological, genetic, mental, economic, cultural or social identity of that person. This is a pretty broad definition and thus much of the information that is collected may be classified as personal data. The GDPR provides three basic privacy rights and we respect these rights through our Data Protection Policy. These rights are: The right to request to view personal data that has been collected. The right to correct personal data that we have collected and that has errors or is incorrect. The right to request that personal information collected be deleted. The fines and penalties for failing to provide these rights or to follow the GDPR can be huge, up to four percent of global revenue, so this law is not to be taken lightly. CERTIFIED HOSTING’S NEW DATA PROTECTION POLICY The Certified Hosting Data Protection Policy (“Policy”) may be found at www.CertifiedHosting.com/GDPR. Certified Hosting has always complied with the EU data protection laws and was a participant in the Safe Harbor Certification Program that was operated by the US Department of Commerce in cooperation with the predecessor law to the GDPR. Certified Hosting is also compliant with the new GDPR and thus the new Policy is designed to inform visitors, customers and others about the collection, processing and storage of personal data that is provided to Certified Hosting. The personal data that Certified Hosting collects comes from a variety of possible sources such as visitors, potential customers, job seekers, vendors and many others. The Policy outlines how we collect, process and store personal data and other information that we collect from these various possible sources. There are four types of situations where we collect persona data from visitors, including: Visitors: We collect minimal data from visitors to our site. This data is mostly in the form of analytical data and website usage and is set out in Section 4 of the policy. Contact: We collect more personal data from people who initiate contact with us through the website, email or any other method of communication. The kind of information that we collect on these types of requests is outlined in Section 5 of the policy. Potential and actual customers: We collect more personal data when you apply for and become a customer of Certified Hosting. This information required is much more extensive as we need a variety of information to properly provide our services to you and your organization. This kind of information is set out in Section 6 of the policy. Job seekers: We collect different personal information for those who contact Certified Hosting to seek employment. This type of situation is set out in Section 7 of the policy. To manage the data protection process, I have appointed as the new Data Protection Officer. While not every organization needs to appoint a Data Protection Officer, Certified Hosting has made the decision to go in this direction to implement the best possible system to protect personal data, respond to inquiries and to assist customers with issues that may arise under the GDPR. Under the GDPR, the Data Protection Officer is responsible for managing the internal data management activities, assisting with data protection assessments, work with our technical staff and responding to inquiries from individuals seeking to review, edit or delete their personal information. The GDPR also sets out several other responsibilities of the Data Protection Officer and I will be responsible for those tasks as well. You may contact the Certified Hosting Data Protection Officer at DPO@certifiedhosting.com. WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW FOR YOUR BUSINESS The best solution is always to seek legal advice to review your situation, your policies and practices to make sure that you are compliant with the GDPR. For you and your business, it is important to note that you are responsible for the data you collect, process and store. Any personal data that you collect belonging to an EU citizens is specifically subject to the GDPR and thus you should be careful to follow the law. If you regularly collect detailed personal data from EU citizens, then you should carefully review your policies and practices to make sure you are compliant with the GDPR. You should consider contacting legal counsel to review your practices and policies to make sure that you are compliant with the GDPR. If you are an individual or company based in the EU, then you should absolutely contact your attorney to review your practices. Don’t hesitate and hope for the best. Certified Hosting as your webhost and service provider, licenses the equipment to you for your use; you are, however, the data collector and processor. Because the GDPR may well apply to your organization and the data you collect, process and store, you should make sure that you are complaint to protect you from claims brought in the EU. While I cannot provide you with specific legal advice for your business or practices, I can answer general questions regarding my understanding of the GDPR and how Certified Hosting has implemented the requirements. Please feel free to contact me at DPO@certifiedhosting.com. The post DATA PROTECTION POLICY NOW ONLINE – HOW THIS AFFECTS YOU appeared first on CertifiedHosting.

Updates to cPanel’s Privacy Policy

cPanel Blog -

  Communication Re-Opt In We’ve been preparing in several ways to support our commitments to customers and end users. Per GDPR regulations and our data processing practices, if you wish to receive communications from cPanel moving forward, you must re-opt in by completing this form. GDPR cPanel has recently updated a number of its agreements to facilitate GDPR compliance.  We’ve done two things: We’ve revised our privacy policy …

HostGator 2019 Technology Scholarship

HostGator Blog -

The post HostGator 2019 Technology Scholarship appeared first on HostGator Blog. HostGator’s Annual Scholarship Each school semester, HostGator aims to help college students achieve their goals of graduating and entering the professional world. In fact, HostGator was founded in a college dorm room back in 2002, so we understand the importance and the impact students can make in the world. That’s why we’re so excited to announce our 2018 fall technology scholarship for college students! Being in the technology sector ourselves, we know firsthand what a massive impact technology has made. Now we want to know your thoughts on how technology will impact the future. We will be selecting three students to win a $1,500 scholarship based on their answers to the essay question, “In what industry or area do you see technology making the largest impact in the next 10 years?” These scholarship funds must be used for qualified school expenses such as tuition, fees, books and board for the 2018-2019 academic year. How to Enter: Send us your essay to hgscholarship@hostgator.com and make sure it includes: Your completed 500 word essay attached as a Google Doc Ensure your name is in the title of the Google Doc What college or university you’re attending Your expected year of graduation Your intended major The deadline for submissions is July 30th, 2018 and we will be notifying the winners around August 15th, 2018. Eligibility: You must be enrolled in an associate’s degree, bachelor’s degree or graduate level program at an accredited 2-year college or 4-year anniversary during the 2018-2019 academic year. Employees or immediate family members of employees of HostGator or Endurance International Group are ineligible. Students of all majors are encouraged to apply! View the 2018 HostGator Technology Scholarship Rules We look forward to reading your entries! For more information on HostGator web hosting, please visit our home page. Read about last year’s scholarship winners here. Digital Rights Agreement: By submitting an entry to this competition, you agree that all essay and content submissions will become the property of HostGator and may be used in marketing materials, reposted or displayed online in whole or partial form without notification.   Find the post on the HostGator Blog

Happy 15th Birthday WordPress!

The Domain.com Blog -

It’s a special weekend for the internet as WordPress celebrates its 15 year anniversary! On May 27, 2003, WordPress announced its first release, promoting its free services such as intelligent line breaks and a link manager. How far WordPress has come over the last 15 years! Users now have thousands of pre-made themes to choose from, plugins for every need, and an easy-to-use interface. It’s no wonder a third of the internet now relies on WordPress to power their sites! WordPress will be hosting worldwide meet ups for users on May 27. Find your local celebration here. Parties will have swag, seminars, guest speakers, and more. Ready to get started with WordPress this weekend? Domain.com is now offering a free .blog domain registration with every WordPress plan purchase. All plans come with unlimited storage and pre-installed themes and plugins, meaning you can instantly get started on a new website. Cheers to 15 years, WordPress!

Leveling the Web: 12 Questions with Accessibility Expert Gian Wild

DreamHost Blog -

Gian Wild isn’t waiting on the world to change — she’s taking things into her own hands. As CEO, founder, and president of AccessibilityOz, a successful accessibility consulting company, she has put her heart and soul into her business and what it stands for. Wild, who grew up in Melbourne, Australia, is dedicated to helping people succeed, especially those who have disadvantages, and she practices what she preaches professionally. Because of her rigorous travel schedule — the result of speaking at conferences worldwide (the DreamHost team met her at a WordCamp) — she needs help tending her two dogs and cat. For several years, she’s had housemates who look after her pets for her in exchange for rent. Wild does this to assist people who are in transitional stages of life, but she’s quick to point out that it isn’t all about her helping them. “It really is a two-way street — we both get something out of the relationship and yet no money is involved,” Wild says. This is just one of the ways she trying to level society’s playing field. The main way comes through her work of making websites accessible to people with disabilities. “I think it is really important to question the things that we often take for granted in society. For example, why are people expected to work 40 hours a week? Why not 50? Why not a hundred? Why not 20? I think society was set up for a particular type of individual: white, hetero, cis, able-bodied, male, middle-class, married, and middle-aged,” she explains. “Well, that’s not the case for most people in society today, and I think that things need to change accordingly.” Wild’s think-outside-the-box perspective has her working around the clock. Like DreamHost, she empowers those in the digital realm, and her insights just may help you see your website in a whole new light. 1. Let’s start off with the basics! What is web accessibility and why is it important? The web has changed people’s lives significantly — we have all the world’s information at our fingertips. We can communicate with people around the world, hear viewpoints that we have never heard before, and undertake activities instantaneously. The web is said to be a great equalizer. However, people with disabilities can access none of this if the sites themselves are not accessible. I believe in the societal model of disability — that society disables people with disabilities (by not providing ramps into buildings or accessible public transport, for example). We have technology that can greatly enhance a person’s life by allowing them to do their own grocery shopping, their own banking, talk to people similar to them on the other side of the world, etc. If the developers haven’t made that content accessible then it is really adding insult to injury. People with disabilities are already disabled by the world around them; making online content inaccessible as well is, I believe, a violation of human rights. Imagine always causing some kind of electronic disturbance when handling computers or phones. And because of this disturbance things just won’t work or take 10 times longer than usual. Imagine how your life would change due to that — and how you would change as a person. Would you still be able to do the job you currently do? Would you be able to keep in contact with friends? Would you be able to watch your favorite TV show? Now imagine that a tech company comes out with a phone that is much more robust and isn’t affected by your electronic disturbance. That’s the difference between inaccessible and accessible sites. Related: 20 Tips on How to Make Your Website Accessible 2. How did you become interested in this field? When I was at university I worked part-time for one of the first web development firms in Australia. One of our clients was the Vision Australia Foundation (similar to the National Federation for the Blind in the United States), and I was tasked with figuring out how to make sure the website could be used by their constituents. Because this was in 1998, there were no Web Content Accessibility Guidelines and the web was very different to how it is now; we had to go out and work with people with vision impairments to determine what they could and couldn’t access. I then worked on the Victorian Accessibility Guidelines and the very first Australian Level AAA website. 3. How did AccessibilityOz begin? In Australia, the government endorsed WCAG 2 in 2010, requiring that government and commercial organizations meet accessibility guidelines between 2012 and 2014. This meant there were a lot of organizations looking into accessibility in 2011. As I had worked in the accessibility industry for 12 years, many of these organizations contacted me about accessibility projects. I was running Usability and Accessibility Services at Monash University at the time; my boss had just left, and I decided to move on. It took about a month to choose whether to build a company like AccessibilityOz or to work as a freelancer. I ultimately decided to start AccessibilityOz so I could provide more accessibility advice than was possible as just one person. People who often find it difficult to find employment — people with disabilities, working parents (mostly mothers), and part-time workers — are actually often the best employees. They are loyal, efficient, and communicative. When I started AccessibilityOz, I wanted to mimic the percentage of people with disabilities in the population in my own organization; across the world, approximately 20 percent of all people have some kind of significant disability. I actively hired people with disabilities — and still do. Now 60 percent of our staff has a disability. We currently have 10 employees in Australia, the United States, and Europe and are looking to hire another three in the next month. We do not succeed despite hiring people with disabilities; we succeed because we hire people with disabilities (and working parents, etc.). We succeed because we care about our staff. And it’s difficult to say this, because often it is the companies that talk the most about how great they are to work for are, in reality, the worst companies to work for. But I believe it is true for us — it is important to me that AccessibilityOz is a fair and supportive workplace. And I may work very long hours, but I don’t expect my staff to do so! Watch Wild’s mobile accessibility WordCamp presentation on WordPress TV. 4. People say that you’re passionate about your job and this field. What drives you? I’ve never thought of myself as passionate, but I have been told many times that I am! When I started AccessibilityOz I wanted to provide employment opportunities for people with disabilities, and even in the last couple of years, I have been horrified about the inaccessibility of many websites. I have always believed that making websites accessible is not that difficult and is a good business practice and a socially responsible thing to do. 5. Why is passion so important when it comes to careers? Passion is incredibly important to my career — as a business owner, I work seven days a week, 52 weeks a year. It becomes very difficult to do this if you don’t really believe in what you are doing. Occasionally I am exhausted and want to stop working, but it is my passion that keeps me going until things are done. Keep up with Wild: check out her website, LinkedIn profile, Twitter feed, or upcoming speaking engagements. 6. What kind of characteristics does it take for someone to be a successful employee at your company? They need to be team players and care about accessibility. We all work remotely, and we have staff around the world, so they need to be self-motivated and able to work from home. I am a big believer in hiring people with the right attitude and training them up as necessary. In fact, we often don’t hire people with a lot of knowledge about accessibility as we find that they test very differently to how we test for accessibility; sometimes unlearning skills is harder than learning skills! And, of course, we actively hire people with disabilities. 7. What should small-business owners be asking themselves in regards to web accessibility? Being a small business owner, I understand that there are always too many things to do and not enough time (or money!) to do them all. However, I think it is important that small-business owners know that people with disabilities are just like other customers — having inaccessible content or functionality means that you are blocking some of your customers. In terms of first steps, there are a bunch of free accessibility tools and resources, including WebAIM’s WAVE, our Accessibility Factsheets, and OzPlayer (free for sites with less than 10 videos). Also, ask your web developers about accessibility and indicate that it is important your content is accessible. Related: The 30 Best Apps for Small Businesses in 2018 8. What are some common mistakes? In terms of common mistakes, the biggest mistake is thinking that you don’t have customers or clients with disabilities. Twenty percent of the population has some kind of disability. If you could reach 20 percent more people, how much would you pay? Think about the money people spend on marketing, AdWords, SEO, etc. Perhaps spend your money on making content accessible? 9. Is there anything that companies can do be more aware of accessibility issues? There is a lot of information out there about accessibility. If you are a large company you will have staff with disabilities. Reach out to them; ask them what is inaccessible and what can be improved. However, if you conduct user testing with them, make sure you pay them as they are truly accessibility experts in their disability field! Consider appointing an Accessibility Champion that can go to accessibility conferences like the CSUN, M-enabling, the ICT Accessibility Testing Symposium, and Accessing Higher Ground and bring information back to the company. 10. Are there any aspects that companies just don’t seem to understand? People tend to overestimate how much accessibility will cost. And they often believe it is something done at the very end of a build. It is much more expensive — and there’s a lot more rework involved — when a site is tested at the end, as opposed to throughout the project. Also, people seem to think an accessible site is a boring site — or unusable. This is one of the reasons our website, AccessibilityOz, is so colorful: to dispel this myth. Ready to build an accessible website? Sign up for DreamHost’s email newsletter today! 11. How are you involved with WordPress? We did an in-depth evaluation of WYSIWYG editors, and WordPress really came out on top in terms of accessibility support and compliance. I try to speak at WordPress conferences, and all the sites we build are in WordPress. We also have an accessible slideshow that can be installed in both WordPress and Drupal sites. I’d actually like to be more involved if I could find the time! 12. Ten years from now, what would you hope is different about the tech community? With the advent of augmented reality and virtual reality, the world is really going to change. Often we see technology specifically designed for people with disabilities move into the mainstream; voice recognition is an example of this. What will be really interesting is how these new technologies will enable — or disable — people with disabilities. I hope that these technologies greatly improve the lives of people with disabilities, but as I like to say, you don’t accidentally make something accessible — you need to be aware and consider accessibility at all times. If people ignore accessibility when creating these new technologies, they will be just as inaccessible as some of the content that is available today. Conversely, if people consider accessibility needs, it could change people’s lives and give them the opportunity to engage in society in ways they have been unable to do. Empowering people is one of DreamHost’s core values. That’s why we’re committed to making WordPress even better with code, community contributions, and expert-level support.   The post Leveling the Web: 12 Questions with Accessibility Expert Gian Wild appeared first on DreamHost.

Healthcare Must Make Disaster Recovery Planning a Priority  

The Rackspace Blog & Newsroom -

The latest security survey confirms what many healthcare executives already know and fear: the healthcare industry has become a top target for ransomware attacks. “Cyberattacks of the last few years have become more ruthless and sophisticated,” wrote ZDNet recently, with ransomware a primary cause for concern. Healthcare is especially vulnerable, due in part to the […] The post Healthcare Must Make Disaster Recovery Planning a Priority   appeared first on The Official Rackspace Blog.

How to Create a Facebook Ad With Business Manager

Social Media Examiner -

Want to use Facebook for advertising? Wondering how to create your first Facebook ad using Business Manager? In this article, you’ll learn how to create a Facebook page post ad using Facebook Business Manager. #1: Set Up Facebook Business Manager If you don’t already have a personal Facebook profile, creating that profile is your first [...] The post How to Create a Facebook Ad With Business Manager appeared first on .

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